Monthly Archives: May 2012

2012 NFL Draft all-steal team

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Could Giants second round receiver Rueben Randle be one of the draft’s biggest steals?

 

What is an “All-Steal” team? It is, in this case, a starting eleven — on both offense and defense — of players selected in great value positions of the draft. Of course it’s rather early to make an informed determination of who is truly a ‘steal’ from the 2012 rookie class, but lets take a look at some of the value picks who could vie for the label. Here is NFL Draft Update’s 2012 All-Steal team:

 

QB: Kirk Cousins, Michigan State (Washington Redskins – Round 4 – 102)

RB: Lamar Miller, Miami [FL] (Miami Dolphins – Round 4 – 97)

WR: Rueben Randle, LSU (New York Giants – Round 2 – 63)

WR: Juron Criner, Arizona (Oakland Raiders – Round 5 – 168)

WR: Marvin Jones, California (Cincinnati Bengals – Round 5 – 166)

TE: James Hanna, Oklahoma (Dallas Cowboys – Round 6 – 186)

OT: Bobby Massie, Ole Miss (Arizona Cardinals – Round 4 – 112)

OT: Andrew Datko, Florida State (Green Bay Packers – Round 7 – 241)

OG: Brandon Washington, Miami [FL] (Philadelphia Eagles – Round 6 – 200)

OG: Justin Anderson, Georgia (Indianapolis Colts – Round 7 – 208)

C: David Molk, Michigan (San Diego Chargers – Round 7 – 226)

 

Honorable Mention(s): RB Michael Smith (Tampa Bay Buccaneers – Round 7 – 212) | WR Tommy Streeter (Baltimore Ravens – Round 6 – 198)

 

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DE: Jared Crick, Nebraska (Houston Texans – Round 4 – 126)

DE: Cam Johnson, Virginia (San Francisco 49ers – Round 7 – 237) *Will play 3-4 OLB.

DT: Josh Chapman, Alabama (Indianapolis Colts – Round 5 – 136)

DT: Billy Winn, Boise State (Cleveland Browns – Round 6 – 205)

LB: Danny Trevathan, Kentucky (Denver Broncos – Round 6 – 188)

LB: Audie Cole, North Carolina State (Minnesota Vikings – Round 7 – 210)

LB: Travis Lewis, Oklahoma (Detroit Lions – Round 7 – 223)

CB: Brandon Boykin, Georgia (Philadelphia Eagles – Round 4 – 123)

CB: Alfonso Dennard, Nebraska (New England Patriots – Round 7 – 224)

S: Winston Guy, Kentucky (Seattle Seahawks – Round 6 – 181)

S: Antonio Allen, South Carolina (New York Jets – Round 7 – 242)

 

Honorable Mention: DT Kheeston Randall, Texas (Miami Dolphins – Round 7 – 215)

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

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2013 NFL Draft spotlight: QB Tyler Wilson, Arkansas

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Age: 22
Height: 6’3″
Weight: 220 lbs.
College: Arkansas
Class: r-Senior

 

Stats

2011 – QB rating: 148.4 | Comp/Att: 277/438 | Comp%: 63.2 | Yards: 3,638 | TD: 24 | INT: 6

2010 – QB rating: 155.4 | Comp/Att: 34/51 | Comp%: 66.7 | Yards: 453 | TD: 4 | INT: 3

2009 – QB rating: 119.2 | Comp/Att: 22/36 | Comp%: 61.1 | Yards: 218 | TD: 2 | INT: 2

2008* – QB rating: 73.2 | Comp/Att: 11/22 | Comp%: 50.0 | Yards: 69 | TD: 1 | INT: 2

 

*Received a medical hardship.

 

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Positives

-Stellar arm with great velocity and zip. Can make all the throws with ease.

-Does a nice job of ‘feeling’ pressure and keeping his eyes down field.

-Stands tall and delivers passes without fear while defenders are bearing down on him.

-Squares shoulders nicely before throwing the football.

-Very good athlete. Above-average at creating time with his feet while scrambling.

-Typically displays good ability to protect the football with two hands while scrambling behind the line of scrimmage.

-Wisely slides to avoid big hits from defenders when scrambling past the line of scrimmage.

-Doesn’t often place passes in dangerous areas; generally keeps the ball where only his man has a chance.

-Capable of going through progressions with patience, but making quick reads if necessary.

-Doesn’t often ‘overthrow’ short-to-intermediate range passes. Exhibits good touch.

-Pretty tight spiral on most passes. No problems throwing a catchable ball.

-Kept turnovers through the air very limited; only six interceptions in 2011, and no mutli-INT games.

-Accuracy is better than statistics would lead you to believe — and statistics aren’t bad. Dealt with drops from receivers.

-Highly productive in a tough SEC conference, and allowed for a seamless transition in the post-Ryan Mallett era at Arkansas.

 

Negatives/Questions

-Mechanics outside of the pocket need development.

-Doesn’t release the ball at it’s highest point on a consistent basis. Has a bit of sidearm action — which is even more exaggerated while throwing on the run.

-Gets rid of the ball quickly, but has a tendency to cock his arm back during throwing motion, lengthening his release a bit.

-Could do a better job leading receivers on crossing routes, allowing them to run after the catch.

-Primarily took snaps out of shotgun; footwork is a little raw while dropping back.

-Tends to throw the ball before properly setting his feet.

-Occasionally puts too much muscle on deep passes, forcing some unnecessary incompletions.

-Will sometimes stare down targets.

-Average play-action. Not necessarily a weakness, but not a strength either.

 

Final Thoughts

A comparable player to that of Chicago Bears quarterback Jay Cutler both as a player and prospect, Wilson has all the necessary tools to be successful in the NFL. Like Cutler, I project Wilson (at this time) to be the third quarterback selected in the 2013 NFL Draft behind Matt Barkley and Logan Thomas. The former high school baseball star has a very high ceiling, and if he manages to put up similar numbers this season + tighten up his overall mechanics, he’ll undoubtedly pique the interest of teams picking in the top 10-15 range next April.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

2013 NFL Draft Spotlight: QB Landry Jones, Oklahoma

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Age: 23
Height: 6’4″
Weight: 229 lbs.
College: Oklahoma
Class: r-Senior

 

Stats

2011 – QB rating: 141.6 | Comp/Att: 355/562 | Comp%: 63.2 | Yards: 4,463 | TD: 29 | INT: 15

2010 – QB rating: 146.3 | Comp/Att: 405/617 | Comp%: 65.6 | Yards: 4,718 | TD: 38 | INT: 12

2009 – QB rating: 130.8 | Comp/Att: 261/449 | Comp%: 58.1 | Yards: 3,198 | TD: 26 | INT: 14

 

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Positives

-Big, tall kid who won’t have trouble finding throwing lanes in the NFL.

-Will leave school with nearly four full years of starting experience.

-Exhibits good anticipation and timing with receivers.

-When given the necessary time, he displays the ability to drive the football down field.

-Patient to let the play develop.

-Over time he continues to improve at making pre-snap adjustments within his offense.

-Nice spin to his passes. Catchable ball. Check.

-Arm is far from elite, but he can make sideline and stick throws.

-Quality sideline accuracy on rollouts; pretty comfortable passing while on the move.

-Squares shoulders and sets feet well. Just needs to do it more consistently.

 

Negatives/Questions

-Played out of a strict spread offense; utilized easy reads and many checkdowns.

-Seldom took snaps under center; played almost exclusively out of the shotgun.

-Tendency to forget or ditch mechanics when facing pressure.

-Arm motion isn’t always fluid and consistent from play-to-play.

-Displays occasional zip to his passes, but lacks any sort of true velocity. Arm strength is average at best.

-A little delayed and long in releasing the football.

-Play action doesn’t fool anyone.

-Not a great athlete. Can’t create or keep plays alive with his feet.

-Pocket presence isn’t bad, but it needs development.

-Ball placement isn’t always very good, especially on deeper throws.

-Has the tendency to loft the ball a little too much on deeper passes — allowing defenders to better play the football.

-Some questionable decisions on tape. Doesn’t risk interceptions very much, but throws into double coverage at non-advantageous times.

 

Final Thoughts

The key to Landry Jones’ draft grade by this season’s end will rely on how much more true ability he can flash to entice teams. As of right now, I have a hard time grading him out as a top 15-20 selection, let alone top 10. He is a borderline 1st round grade in my evaluation as of right now, solely because the consistency and overall natural skills aren’t on display enough for my liking. He has the ability to be a highly sought after player, but there are plenty of questions that need answering this season, and it was a very wise decision for Jones to return to school to get the opportunity to answer them. Landry Jones is a calm, collected, durable, and tested individual. Not often do you see players of his caliber stick around all four years — especially when they’ve started as many games as he has. This is a great chance for scouts and evaluators to see if Jones’ work ethic and willingness to get better is what most expect it to be; or if over time he has gotten complacent. It’s one of many interesting side plots to the 2013 NFL Draft, and people love senior quarterbacks. Landry Jones is one of the nation’s best in that regard, but ‘how’ good can he be? We’ll have to wait and see.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

2013 NFL Draft spotlight: QB Logan Thomas, Virginia Tech

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Age: 20
Height: 6’6″
Weight: 254 lbs.
College: Virginia Tech
Class: r-Junior

 

Stats

2011 – QB rating: 135.50 | Comp/Att: 234/391 | Comp%: 59.8 | Yards: 3,013 | TD: 19 | INT: 10

 

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Positives

-Possesses an elite arm.

-Has intriguingly nice size and bulk to his frame.

-A uniquely gifted athlete; quick + agile when on the move. Long-strider capable of running away from defenders when hitting top speed. Has a bit of a power element to his running game as well.

-True playmaker at the quarterback position, capable of keeping plays alive with his feet and buying time. Does well to improvise when the play breaks down.

-Good habit of properly setting feet prior to throwing.

-Transfers weight from back foot to front foot nicely and drives the ball.

-Spins a clean, catchable football.

-Stationary accuracy on both short or long distance throws is typically pin-point.

-While throwing on the run, he maintains velocity and above-average accuracy.

-Has a quick arm motion and regularly releases the football at its highest point.

-Throws lateral routes (swings, RB/WR screens, etc.) nicely.

-Displays good touch and precision when necessary; doesn’t often ‘overthrow’ touch patterns.

-Good arch on deep ball. Drops it into receiver’s hands nicely.

 

Negatives/Questions

-Pocket presence and ‘feeling’ back-side pressure.

-Has to do a better job protecting the football when scrambling and running.

-Took majority of snaps from shotgun.

-Needs to develop more fluidity and rhythm in his drop backs. A little unpolished under center.

-Has streaks where he can get erratic in his throws.

-Comp% numbers don’t properly reflect how accurate he can be due to some minor mechanical issues.

-Would benefit from being more patient through his progressions.

-Sometimes doesn’t allow the play to develop for him to identify secondary options.

-Can occasionally get flustered in the face of pressure when defenders bear down.

 

Final Thoughts

While Logan Thomas is a unique player and grade all on his own, I took an extra look this time around to see if I saw more of Cam Newton or more of Terrelle Pryor in terms of an overall quarterback prospect. Thomas is neither, but he’s far closer to being the 1st overall pick-caliber player Newton was, as opposed to strictly being the raw, unpolished passer with undeveloped footwork — but high caliber athleticism and upside — that Pryor was. Logan Thomas isn’t nearly as polished or cognitively advanced under center like Matt Barkley, but he possesses absolutely no physical limitations and the negatives surrounding his game can all be massaged with coaching. Thomas got better with every week last season and provided he is able to carry that over into the 2012 season and add some more polish to his game, he can undoubtedly push to be the top pick in the 2013 NFL Draft — he has the type of ability and upside. A tremendous athlete with a true ability for the position. It will be interesting to see how Logan Thomas — a high school QB/WR/DB recruited to Va Tech as a tight end — will adjust to life without his top two targets Jarrett Boykin and Danny Coale, who’ve now moved on to the NFL. Of course, he is an underclassman with two years of eligibility remaining, but he will be graduating this year, and another successful campaign could most certainly intrigue scouts and force him to enter early.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

2013 NFL Draft spotlight: QB Matt Barkley, USC

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Age: 21
Height: 6’2″
Weight: 230 lbs.
College: USC
Class: Senior

 

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Positives

-Cerebral.

-Quick arm motion. Releases the ball over his head when throwing, which counters any height deficiencies quite nicely. Winds up a little when arm is in back-swing, which lengthens motion a bit, but has a quick follow-through to shorten his action.

-Played in a pro-style offense and was asked to make pre-snap adjustments and multiple reads. Handled it very well and improved annually. Goes through progressions very nicely.

-Won’t be confused for Mike Vick, but moves well behind the line of scrimmage on roll-outs and bootlegs.

-Stays loose on his feet and aware in the pocket; decent avoiding the rush while in the pocket.

-Tight and polished mechanics. He’s developed very few bad habits, if any at all in that regard. Sets feet well, holds ball (with two hands) up near the ear hole, delivery and motion remain consistent.

-A good rhythm passer. Doesn’t get flapped by pressure and hits too often, and keeps mechanics tight throughout games.

-Intermediate accuracy is spot on. Reliable accuracy on the move as well.

-When nothing is available he can scramble back to the line of scrimmage and sometimes gain short-yardage, but wisely slides to avoid contact — knows his limitations as a runner.

-Above-average play-action game. Sells the run pretty well and catches backside defenders off-balance occasionally.

-Will stand tall and take hits to deliver passes. Doesn’t often let pressure affect his rhythm.

-Has a killer instinct; not afraid to make tough throws or take calculated risks down field.

-Spins it well with solid consistency. He throws a very catchable football.

-Utilizes the “pump-fake” effectively.

-Quality touch when throwing fades and open fly routes.

-Timing is good, and does a nice job leading receivers on crossing routes for the most part.

-Ball placement: typically in safe locations. Minimized interceptions in 2011 by placing his passes where defenders can’t make a play on them. The majority of the time, he will to choose to overthrow a receiver on a risky matchup as opposed to trying to force it into danger.

-A leader with a calm and stoic demeanor; became a captain as a true Sophomore and will leave USC as the school’s first-ever 3-time captain.

-Heralded high school recruit who was near-mechanically polished before beginning his collegiate football career.

 

Negatives/Questions

-While he can get the ball deep, Barkley lacks an “elite” power-arm and will have to rely more on his intelligence when he gets to the next level than he already does now.

-Accuracy on his deep ball lacks true consistency. Something he must continue to work on.

-Has the tendency to over-compensate on some passes and occasionally overthrows targets from intermediate distance.

-Only an average athlete; not capable of scrambling or running away from many defenders.

-Doesn’t always take sacks when it is the smartest choice to do so; occasionally throwing dangerously when attempting to avoid a loss.

-Passes can rise on him a little bit in mid-short range distance from time-to-time.

-Stature and dimensions are only average.

-Injury notes: prior to 2010 spring, he had minor surgery on his right (throwing) wrist — which the school said was to relieve stiffness and clean up inflammation / In 2010 he suffered a sprained ankle in a loss to Oregon State and missed the Notre Dame game.

 

Final Thoughts

A naturally talented and intelligent individual both on and off the field, it’s no surprise why many have Matt Barkley projected to be the 2013 draft’s 1st overall pick. While he lacks the superior birth-given athletic qualities of Cam Newton or Robert Griffin, his notably advanced football IQ and overall polish ensures his status as a top draft prospect with the potential to top the quarterback rankings this season. The elite level supporting cast and stellar receiving core has helped him at times, but it is a stretch, to me, to consider that a negative. He began preparation for the NFL while still in high school; tutored by premier quarterback coach Steve Clarkson — who branded Barkley as a “cross” between Hall of Fame passer Joe Montana and (future Hall of Famer) Tom Brady. Barkley has some loose similarities to Detroit Lions quarterback Matthew Stafford — an equally limited athlete with a touted football acumen and experience in a college pro-style offense — and appears to be a reliable young quarterback with the ability to play through pressure-packed situations in the near future. Provided he can continue to develop at the rate he has been each year and become more consistent in the deep passing game, Matt Barkley can certainly be the first player taken in 2013; he’s the early leader out of the gate after having semi-unexpectedly gone back to school for his Senior campaign. That being said, Barkley doesn’t have a ton to gain this season, but that alone will be a significant test of his mental fortitude. One that will not be lost on any scouts and evaluators throughout the new pre-draft process.

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

NFC Draft Grades (2012)

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Of course, there is truly no telling how each and every draft class will pan out down the road, but the fun of the draft process is evaluating the finalized classes of each organization and grade them based on quality of picks, value of selections, ability to work up (or down) the draft, and fill needs. The NFL Draft is a three-day battle: in order to win the war — and have a strong draft — you must win the individual battles each day. There are a few teams who were able to do that, there are a few who were unable to do it, and there are many who fall in-between. Take it with a grain of salt, and have fun with it. Lets get to it…

 

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Dallas Cowboys

Round 1 (6) – CB Morris Claiborne, LSU

Round 3 (81) – DE Tyrone Crawford, Boise State

Round 4 (113) – OLB Kyle Wilber, Wake Forest

Round 4 (135) – S Matt Johnson, Eastern Washington

Round 5 (152) – WR Danny Coale, Virginia Tech

Round 6 (186) – TE James Hanna, Oklahoma

Round 7 (222) – LB Caleb McSurdy, Montana

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The Cowboys made waves on day one of the draft by flipping a 2nd round pick to St. Louis in order to select the man they wanted all along in LSU CB Morris Claiborne. Claiborne was the highest rated defensive back in the draft and fills a sizable need for Dallas. A 2nd round pick is a small price to pay for such a talent with true #1 CB potential. The team also had a pretty significant need along the D-line; 5-technique in particular, and Dallas made good on filling the position in the 3rd round with Boise State’s Tyrone Crawford — the first Canadian taken in the draft, and a player who could have gone a round earlier. Dallas knocked off yet another need in the 4th round by selecting Wake Forest rush linebacker Kyle Wilber, who will be groomed as the possible replacement for franchise tagged OLB Anthony Spencer and bolster the teams pass rushing depth off the edge. Rounds 4 and 5 brought two talented players in S Matt Johnson and WR Danny Coale, but I did not have either player rated as good value when they were selected. In contrast to that, the Cowboys landed athletic, high potential Oklahoma TE James Hanna in round 6. Hanna is raw, but can be a matchup nightmare in the future if he can continue to develop — very nice bargain where he was taken. Round 7 brought the team an intelligent inside linebacker projection in Montana’s Caleb McSurdy who will fight for a roster spot on special teams. Value could have been a little better in the mid-rounds, but I didn’t see a “bad” pick from Dallas, and it started well at the top.

Grade: B+

 

New York Giants

Round 1 (32) – RB David Wilson, Virginia Tech

Round 2 (63) – WR Rueben Randle, LSU

Round 3 (94) – CB Jayron Hosley, Virginia Tech

Round 4 (127) – TE Adrien Robinson, Cincinnati

Round 4 (131) – OT Brandon Mosley, Auburn

Round 6 (201) – OT Matt McCants, Alabama-Birmingham

Round 7 (239) – DT Markus Kuhn, North Carolina State

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The luxury of being the champion is you typically have the flexibility to do what ever it is you want on draft day, and Jerry Reese — doing as he does — took talent, and didn’t waver much on character concerns. With Brandon Jacobs ineffective and out the door, the Giants opted in round 1 to select RB David Wilson — a smooth in-and-out cutter with hands and downfield quickness who will contribute immediately. In round 2, the G-Men were lucky enough to have talented 1st round-hopeful WR Rueben Randle fall to them. Similarly to Mario Manningham (now in SF), Randle fell on draft day and the Giants capitalized on the value. Due to a failed drug test, the highly gifted, albeit undersized, Jayron Hosley landed with the team late on day two. A move that will undoubtedly pay dividends if he keeps his nose clean. Round 4 brought the Giants TE Adrien Robinson — a slight reach, but an all-around athlete with potential to be an on the line “Y” TE with some development, and OT Brandon Mosley — who could push for the right tackle job early and went nearly a round earlier than some believed. 6th round OT Matt McCants is an unpolished player who needs a lot of development, but was good value and has quick feet and a frame to grow into. 7th round DT Markus Kuhn is only the second German to ever be drafted (Sebastian Vollmer the other); a thickly built interior defender with movement. For the most part, a “value” based draft for Big Blue, with 3-5 players who could help from day one.

Grade: B+

 

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 1 (12) – DT Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State

Round 2 (46) – LB Mychal Kendricks, California

Round 2 (59) – DE Vinny Curry, Marshall

Round 3 (88) – QB Nick Foles, Arizona

Round 4 (123) – CB Brandon Boykin, Georgia

Round 5 (153) – OT Dennis Kelly, Purdue

Round 6 (194) – WR Marvin McNutt, Iowa

Round 6 (200) – OG Brandon Washington, Miami (FL)

Round 7 (229) – RB Bryce Brown, Kansas State

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Top to bottom, the Eagles had another superb draft. Landing DT Fletcher Cox at No. 12 is fantastic value considering most thought it near impossible he’d fall out of the top 10 heading into draft day. COming back and grabbing a nice value and defensive fit in LB Mychal Kendricks (who has multiple LB-spot versatility) and one of my higher rated defenders, DE Vinny Curry, who should bolster the pass rushing rotation immediately. Philly went with big Arizona passer Nick Foles to develop over the next few seasons. Round 4 brought the Eagles, in my view, one of the draft’s best picks in CB Brandon Boykin — a player some thought could be an early 2nd round selection — who will compete in slot/nickel-CB capacity early on if healthy. In round 5, 6’8″, long-armed OT Dennis Kelly is an interesting project, but the team added a pair of true talents in the 6th round: WR Marvin McNutt, a longer downfield target who runs routes well underneath and OG Brandon Washington, a highly talented interior OL who would’ve been taken much earlier had he not declared early — both of which could have gone round 3-4 and been good value. The team also took a gamble on RB Bryce Brown in round 7, the former #1 high school recruit (via Rivals) in 2009.

Grade: A+

 

Washington Redskins

Round 1 (2) – QB Robert Griffin III, Baylor

Round 3 (71) – OG Josh LeRibeus, Southern Methodist

Round 4 (102) – QB Kirk Cousins, Michigan State

Round 4 (119) – LB Keenan Robinson, Texas

Round 5 (141) – OG Adam Gettis, Iowa

Round 6 (173) – RB Alfred Morris, Florida Atlantic

Round 6 (193) – OT Tom Compton, North Dakota

Round 7 (213) – CB Richard Crawford, Southern Methodist

Round 7 (217) – CB Jordan Bernstine, Iowa

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A lot has been made of the bold move the Redskins made to acquire QB Robert Griffin, but all things being considered, it was the right move for the franchise and provided he becomes what he should be, a pair of future 1st round picks simply is not too much. However, the team must counter the loss of future top picks by surrounding their new QB with talent. 3rd and 5th round OGs Josh LeRiberius and Adam Gettis are nice projections and good fits for the team’s zone-blocking scheme, but neither (along with 6th round OT Tom Compton) are likely to step in and help early on — but each has upside. My favorite non-RG3 pick Washington made was grabbing Texas ILB Keenan Robinson in the 4th round. Robinson is a strong, athletic down hill player who delivers pop behind his hits. 6th round RB/FB Alfred Morris is a bit of a tweener who’s slower than a RB and not as big or capable of a blocker to be a true lead blocking FB. Finally, while Kirk Cousins was strong value, when you deal multiple high draft picks for a QB, you need to use what picks you do have far more wisely. Overall, this class has some potential, but little immediate impact aside from RG3. We’ll have to re-evaluate this class maybe more-so than others, but for now the class hinges on the player it was built around.

Grade: C+/B-

 

Chicago Bears

Round 1 (19) – DE Shea McClellin, Boise State

Round 2 (45) – WR Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina

Round 3 (79) – S Brandon Hardin, Oregon State

Round 4 (111) – FB/TE Evan Rodriguez, Temple

Round 6 (184) – CB Isaiah Frey, Nevada

Round 7 (220) – CB Greg McCoy, TCU

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Mixed review on the Bears class. From the top, Shea McClellin is a hard working, clean-as-a-whistle pass rusher with tenacity and intelligence. I’m a little unsure of how he will work as an NFL LDE against bigger, more powerful right tackles, but he should be the high-motor annoyance for opponents needed off the edge opposite Peppers. Trading up in the 2nd round for long-limbed butterfly net Alshon Jeffery was a nice move, as he will add more size out-wide and compliment Brandon Marshall nicely. 3rd round S Brandon Hardin is a high potential athlete with movement and all of the necessary physical skills, but he’s raw and will have to make his mark on special teams first. FB/TE Evan Rodriguez will need to be utilized properly, but he can be a quality “move” TE who can line up everywhere — he has hands as well. CB Isaiah Frey has size and length to be on the boundary, while Greg McCoy is more of a nickel type. I see 2-3 immediate helpers

Grade: B

 

Detroit Lions

Round 1 (23) – OT Riley Reiff, Iowa

Round 2 (54) – WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma

Round 3 (85) – CB Dwight Bentley, Louisiana-Lafayette

Round 4 (125) – DE/OLB Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma

Round 5 (138) – LB Tahir Whitehead, Temple

Round 5 (148) – CB Chris Greenwood, Albion

Round 6 (196) – CB Jonte Green, New Mexico State

Round 7 (223) – LB Travis Lewis, Oklahoma

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Detroit put together a pretty above-average draft from top to bottom, and considering they were unable to address the CB position as they would have probably preferred within rounds 1-2, they tried upgrading the position. Taking right tackle-only Riley Reiff at No. 23 was good value and he will not be asked to do more than he is capable of. Good fit, he helps early. Selecting WR Ryan Broyles in round 2 was a reach and a projection, but provided he is healthy and over his torn ACL, he will compliment Calvin Johnson and 2011 2nd rounder Titus Young rather well underneath with his reliable hands and quick-cut route running ability. The Lions finally addressed CB in round 3 with Dwight Bentley — not the prototypical player I believe they were hoping to land at the position, but a talent, albeit a little unpolished. The team received a pair of steals with Oklahoma defenders Ronnell Lewis in the 4th round and Travis Lewis in the 7th — Ronnell was a day two grade and solid pass rushing rotation upgrade, while Travis is a WLB/MLB type with short-area quickness and smooth lateral movement who was a projected 1st-2nd rounder by some a couple years ago. LB Tahir Whitehead and CB Jonte Green are unpolished development players with upside, while Albion cornerback Chris Greenwood, who the Lions traded up for, could be the gem of this class if he fulfills his potential and translates his size and talent to the next level — more of a boundary CB in the mold of what the team needed. Good class with the potential to be very good.

Grade: B/B+

 

Green Bay Packers

Round 1 (28) – OLB Nick Perry, USC

Round 2 (51) – DE Jerel Worthy, Michigan State

Round 2 (62) – CB Casey Hayward, Vanderbilt

Round 4 (132) – DT Mike Daniels, Iowa

Round 4 (133) – S Jeron McMillian, Maine

Round 5 (163) – LB Terrell Manning, North Carolina State

Round 7 (241) – OT Andrew Datko, Florida State

Round 7 (243) – QB B.J. Coleman, Tennessee-Chattanooga

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Hard to poke a hole in the Pack’s draft. The team chose two fringe 1st round graded defenders in the first two rounds in Nick Perry and Jerel Worthy — both of which play at positions of primary need for Green Bay. The team then went ahead and plucked another quality player at another defensive position of need in quietly coveted Vandy CB Casey Hayward late in round 2. DE Mike Daniels and S Jeron McMillian offer more depth. 5th round ILB Terrell Manning is a productive playmaking ILB type who can be developed — nice value where selected. Finally, Green Bay added two players in the 7th round who have a great opportunity to make the final roster (or practice squad): OT Andrew Datko was, at the very least, an early day three caliber player, if not better, but due to injury he slipped to the last few picks of the draft. Tenn-Chatt QB B.J. Coleman, a Tennessee transfer has a lot of John Skelton to his game, and could have easily been taken two rounds earlier as a developmental passer and nobody would have blinked. Very solid draft for Green Bay.

Grade: B+

 

Minnesota Vikings

Round 1 (4) – OT Matt Kalil, USC

Round 1 (29) – S Harrison Smith, Notre Dame

Round 3 (66) – CB Josh Robinson, Central Florida

Round 4 (118) – WR Jarius Wright, Arkansas

Round 4 (128) – TE Rhett Ellison, USC

Round 4 (134) – WR Greg Childs, Arkansas

Round 5 (139) – S Robert Blanton, Notre Dame

Round 6 (175) – K Blair Walsh, Georgia

Round 7 (210) – LB Audie Cole, North Carolina State

Round 7 (219) – DE Trevor Guyton, California

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Next to no faults in the Minnesota Vikings’ draft class. Between trading down a mere one spot with Cleveland and acquiring extra 4th, 5th, and 7th round picks, the team added multiple players, used their picks wisely, and addressed multiple areas of need. The team got their man all along in franchise left tackle Matt Kalil, a capable pass protector on the blindside for 2011 1st round pick, QB Christian Ponder. Minnesota traded back into round 1 for S Harrison Smith, who although not a 1st round grade, was the best available at a position of exponential need for the Vikes. 3rd round CB Josh Robinson adds much needed speed and playmaking ability and could have been selected a full round earlier in good value. 4th round Arkansas WRs Jarius Wright and Greg Childs are two different player — Wright a speedy slot-type who can move and get vertical, Childs a size+speed outside target with physicality. TE Rhett Ellison has good size and can line up on the line as a “Y” TE and be moved around a bit. S Robert Blanton has versatility and intelligence — won’t play much early on, but a good Cover 2 fit with the ability to play some man. 6th round K Blair Walsh replaces reliable veteran Ryan Longwell; a risky proposition, but he’s significantly cheaper and a better leg on kickoffs. In round 7, the Vikes landed 6’5″ 240 lbs. ILB/SLB Audie Cole who has upside well beyond the round he was chosen, and DE Trevor Guyton has some versatility at DE on run-downs and DT on pass downs, but will have to earn a roster/practice squad spot. Not A+ material, but the trade down with Cleveland, along with acquiring a 2013 4th from Detroit gives the Vikings a very slight edge over teams who pulled a B+ grade.

Grade: A-

 

Atlanta Falcons

Round 2 (55) – C Peter Konz, Wisconsin

Round 3 (91) – OT Lamar Holmes, Southern Mississippi

Round 5 (157) – FB Bradie Ewing, Wisconsin

Round 5 (164) – DE Jonathan Massaquoi, Troy

Round 6 (192) – S Charles Mitchell, Mississippi State

Round 7 (249) – DT Travian Robertson, South Carolina

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As a result of the Julio Jones draft day trade last year, the Falcons were left without multiple picks in this year’s draft. However, that did not stop them from adding a good crop of players. Wisconsin center Peter Konz slipped all the way to No. 55 in round 2, which gives Atlanta a 1st round caliber player despite the fact they did not have a pick in the opening round; great value. Konz represents the long term replacement for veteran Todd McClure at center, and in the meantime, can be plugged into a starting guard role. 3rd round OT Lamar Holmes is raw, but has left tackle potential down the road and his intriguing blend of size, balance, and arm length makes for another good pick along the O-line. At the very least, he has the look of a solid NFL swing tackle. 5th rounder Bradie Ewing is a do-it-all FB who has a bit of John Kuhn to his game; good hands, can block out of the back field & in the run game, and looks comfortable carrying the ball as well. Fellow 5th round pick, DE Jonathan Massaquoi has the potential to be an early impact and one of the best players from the Falcons’ class — a natural pass rusher with leverage and a notable first step off the snap. S Charles Mitchell is a good downhill, in-the-box defender who will help on special teams, but needs lots of development in pass defense. 7th round DT Travian Robertson is a well put together 4-3 NT-type with good run stopping ability, but undeveloped pass rushing technique. Atlanta did as much as they could and stuck to their draft board well.

Grade: B

 

Carolina Panthers

Round 1 (9) – LB Luke Kuechly, Boston College

Round 2 (40) – OG Amini Silatolu, Midwestern State

Round 4 (103) – DE Frank Alexander, Oklahoma

Round 4 (104) – WR Joe Adams, Arkansas

Round 5 (143) – CB Josh Norman, Coastal Carolina

Round 6 (207) – P Brad Nortman, Wisconsin

Round 7 (216) – S D.J. Campbell, California

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Picks between rounds 1-5 are all capable of having an immediate impact on the 2012 Panthers. LB Luke Kuechly will be plugged into the WILL linebacker spot beside middle man Jon Beason and should make an almost seamless transition and compete for Defensive Rookie of the Year honors. 2nd round OG Amini Silatolu is far less polished at his position than Kuechly, but the mean interior blocker has the necessary size and physicality needed to start in the NFL from day one. WR Joe Adams is an electrifying deep threat who possesses definite playmaking ability — he and Steve Smith will be difficult to single-cover. DE Frank Alexander is not fully developed as a pass rusher and will only get better in-time, but still provides quality run defense and an ideal motor for the pros. Small-school CB Josh Norman adds length and matchup ability, and despite the fact that he’s a risk-taker on the field with some character issues off the field, he should have gone a round or two earlier than he did. 6th round P Brad Nortman is accurate and for what it’s worth, has plenty of personality — he should handle Carolina’s punting duties for multiple years. D.J. Campbell is an inexperienced special teams-type with raw coverage ability, but has good physical skills. The draft as a whole could have been better as some talent was left on the board during a few of the Panthers’ picks, but I grade this class slightly better than some might.

Grade: B

 

New Orleans Saints

Round 3 (89) – DT Akiem Hicks, Regina

Round 4 (122) – WR Nick Toon, Wisconsin

Round 5 (162) – S Corey White, Samford

Round 6 (179) – OG Andrew Tiller, Syracuse

Round 7 (234) – OT Marcel Jones, Nebraska

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A lot of the Saints’ draft is potential-based, and that’s unsurprising as the team did not have picks in the first two rounds. More of a C+ type class, but I grade 4th round pick WR Nick Toon better than most; a physically talented pass catcher somewhat in the Marques Colston possession-WR mold. 6th round OG Andrew Tiller is a quick-footed athlete with balance and lateral movement. He’s undeveloped overall, but lots of potential. Similar can be said for 7th round OT Marcel Jones, who could prove to be a capable swing blocker in time if he gets less upright off the snap and properly practices leverage techniques. 5th round DB Corey White is an experienced defender with loads of confidence, which is a good attitude to have when playing special teams as a rookie. Of course, the draft class began with American-born Canadian college football DT Akiem Hicks of Regina; a former highly-touted JUCO recruit who committed to LSU before being ruled ineligible. Hicks has size and a “plus” first-step, but will be an interesting project for the defensive coaching staff.

Grade: B-

 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Round 1 (7) – S Mark Barron, Alabama

Round 1 (31) – RB Doug Martin, Boise State

Round 2 (58) – LB Lavonte David, Nebraska

Round 5 (140) – LB Najee Goode, West Virginia

Round 6 (174) – CB Keith Tandy, West Virginia

Round 7 (212) – RB Michael Smith, Utah State

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The best way to summarize the Bucs’ 2012 draft class is that within the first three rounds, the team added two defenders who could push for Defensive Rookie of the Year honors and one player who is in the right situation to take a stab at the Offensive Rookie of the Year award. After trading back a few spots, the Buccaneers landed the draft’s top safety in Alabama’s Mark Barron; a tireless film-room guy with experience and intelligence. He’s also physically gifted and has “plus” physicality from either safety spot. Then Tampa moved back into the bottom of round 1 in order to select it’s new work horse ‘back in Doug Martin, who is thickly built and possesses nice cutting ability and quickness outside of the tackles — some Frank Gore-like qualities to his game.  2nd round LB Lavonte David is a perfect schematic fit and his ability to fly around the field and make tackles should translate to a productive rookie season. Fellow classmate, LB Najee Goode is another proper stylistic fit who has some thickness and downhill ability + closing speed. 6th round CB Keith Tandy is a physical zone-coverage fit who, despite lacking top tier ball skills, has good change of direction and tackles. Finally, the team added sleeper Michael Smith in the 7th round; the “other” Utah State runner behind bruiser Robert Turbin, Smith keeps his feet moving at all times and his one-cut running style is a nice change of pace from more physical runners Doug Martin and LeGarrette Blount.

Grade: B+

 

Arizona Cardinals

Round 1 (13) – WR Michael Floyd, Notre Dame

Round 3 (80) – CB Jamell Fleming, Oklahoma

Round 4 (112) – OT Bobby Massie, Ole Miss

Round 5 (151) – OG Senio Kelemete, Washington

Round 6 (177) – DB Justin Bethel, Presbyterian

Round 6 (185) – QB Ryan Lindley, San Diego State

Round 7 (221) – OT Nate Potter, Boise State

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Arizona managed to put together a top to bottom solid class and bolster the depth along a weaker offensive line. From the top, most would argue that the team failed to address more important positions when they opted for WR Michael Floyd at No. 13; not so fast, my friend. In order to improve Kevin Kolb’s effectiveness, surrounding him with more weapons is imperative. If for nothing else, the team desperately needed to add a legitimate #2 WR out-wide opposite Larry Fitzgerald. CB Jamell Fleming is a talented defender with polish who can contribute immediately and 4th round OT Bobby Massie was a 2nd round grade who’s talent level and potential could make him the gem of this class; and at a position of legitimate need for the Cards, no less. 5th and 7th rounders OG Senio Kelemete and OT Nate Potter bolster depth and size along the OL. A pair of quality projects selected in the 6th round, as DB Justin Bethel has potential to be an above-average starter at CB or S in the NFL in time, and QB Ryan Lindley was quietly one of my highest rated passers — live arm, can make all the throws, and drives the ball well. Arizona could have addressed the O-line earlier, but with no 2nd round pick, the team was handcuffed a little.

Grade: B

 

San Franciso 49ers

Round 1 (30) – WR A.J. Jenkins, Illinois

Round 2 (61) – RB LaMichael James, Oregon

Round 4 (117) – OG Joe Looney, Wake Forest

Round 5 (165) – OLB Darius Fleming, Notre Dame

Round 6 (180) – S Trenton Robinson, Michigan State

Round 6 (199) – OG/C Jason Slowey, Western Oregon

Round 7 (237) – OLB Cam Johnson, Virginia

____________________

More offensive explosion and depth defensively sums up the 49ers 2012 draft class. In round 1, the team opted for Illinois playmaker A.J. Jenkins, a productive receiver who adds a new dynamic to an already deep WR core; taken over higher rated WRs, but he would not have lasted much longer. Round 2 was a little surprising, as San Francisco went with another playmaker. This time it was Oregon RB LaMichael James, a speedster who can make defenders miss with ease in the open field and offers the ability to pick up chunks in the passing game through screens and swing plays. OG Joe Looney is a well coached, physical interior blocker who adds depth and could potentially push for playing time. The selection of Notre Dame OLB Darius Fleming was very intriguing, as he is a dynamic athlete with raw, but high-potential pass rushing abilities. 6th round S Trenton Robinson is a good in-the-box type defender with quickness and and a willingness to step up and tackle, but needs to develop his only average cover skills. Fellow round OG/C Jason Slowey is an interesting interior blocker who is very unpolished but possesses ideal physicality and still in the process of filling his frame, as he’s added good weight well over the past couple seasons. The 9ers capped their class with one of the best values of the entire draft in DE Cam Johnson, who will be a project 3-4 OLB. San Francisco didn’t necessarily address needs early, but added a good crop of talented players; some who will help as rookies, others who will need to be coached up.

Grade: B

 

Seattle Seahawks

Round 1 (15) – DE/OLB Bruce Irvin, West Virginia

Round 2 (47) – LB Bobby Wagner, Utah State

Round 3 (75) – QB Russell Wilson, Wisconsin

Round 4 (106) – RB Robert Turbin, Utah State

Round 4 (114) – DT Jaye Howard, Florida

Round 5 (154) – LB Korey Toomer, Idaho

Round 6 (174) – CB Jeremy Lane, Northwestern State

Round 6 (181) – S Winston Guy, Kentucky

Round 7 (225) – OG J.R. Sweezy, North Carolina State

Round 7 (232) – DE Greg Scruggs, Louisville

____________________

Some really took offense to the Seahawks selection of Bruce Irvin in mid-round 1, but considering he is a definite candidate to rack up double-digit sack totals as a situational edge-rusher in his rookie campaign, it’s rather irrelevant when or where he was taken, in my view. 2nd round LB Bobby Wagner is a productive and dynamic playmaking LB who needs some development time, but should make a good transition. 3rd round QB Russell Wilson is limited due to his height, but truly has all the physical tools and intelligence you want out of a young signal caller; could be a steal, could be a wasted pick unless he can get over his 5’10” frame. RB Robert Turbin is a big, intimidating bruiser who should pair well with Marshawn Lynch in breaking down defenses, and fellow 4th round pick, DT Jaye Howard is an active, high motor interior defensive lineman with upside. In round 6, the team added a pair of DBs: Jeremy Lane a lengthy matchup CB who could’ve gone a round earlier and S Winston Guy, a physical in-the-box safety who loves to hit and delivers good pop behind hits. In the 7th, the Seahawks added two DEs; one of which (Sweezy) will try to make the transition to OG, while Scruggs is a bulkier edge defender who’s savvier against the run than the pass. A solid class that has strength in its numbers, but not a whole lot of immediate plug and play starters, which lead to a tentative grade of…

Grade: B

 

St. Louis Rams

Round 1 (14) – DT Michael Brockers, LSU

Round 2 (33) – WR Brian Quick, Appalachian State

Round 2 (39) – CB Janoris Jenkins, North Alabama

Round 2 (50) – RB Isaiah Pead, Cincinnati

Round 3 (65) – DB Trumaine Johnson, Montana

Round 4 (96) – WR Chris Givens, Wake Forest

Round 5 (150) – OG Rokevious Watkins, South Carolina

Round 6 (171) – K Greg Zuerlein, Missouri Western

Round 7 (209) – LB Aaron Brown, Hawai’i

Round 7 (252) – RB Daryl Richardson, Abilene Christian

____________________

Another class who has strength in numbers is St. Louis’. Moving down from No. 6 to No. 14 netted the team a supremely talented and potentially dominant DT Michael Brockers, along with a 2nd round pick, which was flipped to Chicago and eventually turned into electrifying and versatile RB Isaiah Pead, the eventual replacement for Steve Jackson who will receive a good portion of touches as a rookie. But before Pead, the Rams added more help for Sam Bradford out wide, as they began day two with the lengthy and athletic WR Brian Quick; before later taking a 1st round talent in CB Janoris Jenkins at No. 39 overall. The team wasn’t done addressing the secondary need, as St. Louis landed versatile, long-limbed matchup CB/S Trumaine Johnson in the early 3rd round — a 2nd round grade to me. At the top of round 4 the Rams brass added yet another strong value weapon on offense by selecting WR Chris Givens; a talented route runner with good hands underneath and downfield quickness. Givens was a day two value. OG Rokevious Watkins is a solid development prospect in the 5th round, while the team hopes to have found its long term answer at kicker in accurate and heralded small-schooler Greg Zuerlein — quietly one of the draft’s top players at the position. 7th rounders, LB Aaron Brown, an experienced and productive defender with some off-field concerns, and RB Daryl Richardson, a quick-cut runner and younger brother of Bengals RB Bernard Scott. Few holes in the Rams’ draft class, as this crop fills multiple needs and strengthens a few key positions — more so if St. Louis can get production from WRs Brian Quick and Chris Givens early.

Grade: A-

 

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

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AFC Draft Grades (2012)

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Of course, there is truly no telling how each and every draft class will pan out down the road, but the fun of the draft process is evaluating the finalized classes of each organization and grade them based on quality of picks, value of selections, ability to work up (or down) the draft, and fill needs. The NFL Draft is a three-day battle: in order to win the war — and have a strong draft — you must win the individual battles each day. There are a few teams who were able to do that, there are a few who were unable to do it, and there are many who fall in-between. Take it with a grain of salt, and have fun with it. Lets get to it…

 

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Buffalo Bills

Round 1 (10) – CB Stephon Gilmore, South Carolina

Round 2 (41) – G/T Cordy Glenn, Georgia

Round 3 (69) – WR T.J. Graham, NC State

Round 4 (105) – LB Nigel Bradham, Florida State

Round 4 (124) – CB Ron Brooks, LSU

Round 5 (144) – OT Zebrie Sanders, Florida State

Round 5 (147) – LB Tank Carder, TCU

Round 6 (178) – OG Mark Asper, Oregon

Round 7 (251) – K John Potter, Western Michigan

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Buffalo has placed a great emphasis on improving the defense this offseason. Adding All-Pro defensive end Mario Williams and pass rushing ace Mark Anderson will go hand in hand with the improvement of the secondary, and plugging in South Carolina corner Stephon Gilmore greatly bolsters the back-end. A boundary cornerback who can be moved around — true #1 CB potential. My 7th rated player, chosen at No. 10. The Bills believe they have a left tackle in the Marcus McNeill mold with Cordy Glenn. Regardless, he is a 1st round talent taken in the 2nd round who can be used at four OL positions. Best case scenario, 3rd round WR T.J. Graham can be a small, but agile straight line vertical threat, somewhat in the Lee Evans mold. Linebackers Nigel Bradham and Tank Carder are stylistically different — Bradham an athletic OLB-type, Carder a fleet footed, instinctual ILB-type. Both are potential starters, and good values for being picked on day three. LSU cornerback Ron Brooks is a speedy, laterally agile nickel-type who will help on special teams, and 5th round pick Zebrie Sanders has many deficiencies, but has the potential to perhaps outplay his round by being a capable NFL swing-tackle. Solid class at the top and potential starters all through the remainder of the crop.

Grade: B+

 

Miami Dolphins

Round 1 (8) – QB Ryan Tannehill, Texas A&M

Round 2 (42) – OT Jonathan Martin, Stanford

Round 3 (72) – DE Olivier Vernon, Miami (FL)

Round 3 (78) – TE Michael Egnew, Missouri

Round 4 (97) – RB Lamar Miller, Miami (FL)

Round 5 (155) – LB Josh Kaddu, Oregon

Round 6 (183) – WR B.J. Cunningham, Michigan State

Round 7 (215) – DT Kheeston Randall, Texas

Round 7 (227) – WR Rishard Matthews, Nevada

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Starts at the top with the quarterback, and Miami was the best fit for Ryan Tannehill. Good situation for both parties, and provided he picks up on the offense as quickly as expected (and the team continues adding weapons for him moving forward), I believe he has a nice future ahead. 2nd round pick Jonathan Martin is a 1st round caliber player, but playing the nimble footed pass protector at right tackle against bulkier, stronger NFL left ends will be an interesting test — Miami desperately needed help on the right side. Defensive end Olivier Vernon is scratching the surface of his potential, but must continue developing. Picked more for his quality upside than ability to contribute immediately. Similar can be said for athletic 5th round linebacker Josh Kaddu, who should be a special teams contributor from day one. 3rd round TE Michael Egnew will have a tough transition, but can help on short, underneath routes. 4th round pick Lamar Miller, nicknamed “Quick 6,” has tremendous speed and was a fantastic value for the Phins. Late round WR B.J. Cunningham and especially 7th round DT Kheeston Randall could have gone earlier. Should have addressed wide receiver much earlier, but a good class with some potential day three steals.

Grade: B

 

New England Patriots

Round 1 (21) – DE Chandler Jones, Syracuse

Round 1 (25) – LB Dont’a Hightower, Alabama

Round 2 (48) – S Tavon Wilson, Illinois

Round 3 (90) – DE Jake Bequette, Arkansas

Round 6 (197) – DB Nate Ebner, Ohio State

Round 7 (224) – CB Alfonzo Dennard, Nebraska

Round 7 (235) – WR Jeremy Ebert, Northwestern

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New England, in totally uncharacteristic fashion, opted to trade up in the 1st round this year, not once, but twice. They did so in order to select two 3-down defenders who are very capable of getting to the quarterback from different spots. Chandler Jones is far from a finished product, but he has a high ceiling and a big, long athletic frame. Hightower is a very bulky, strong downhill thumping linebacker who was a leader on one of the best college defenses of all time at Alabama. A quality pass rusher who isn’t the physical specimen former teammate Rolando McClain was out of the draft, but possesses higher football IQ. On the other hand, 2nd round pick Tavon Wilson was a reach regardless of how some try to justify it — but if you believe in a player, you take him when you can. Still, poor value, but he should vie for playing time early-on and help on special teams. 3rd rounder Jake Bequette is a competent, smart defender who will also be in the pass rushing rotation from day one. A pair of special teamers in round 6 and 7 in Ebner and Ebert — Ebner being a former rugby player at Ohio State is an interesting addition to New England’s special teams core. On recommendation from Ohio State football coach, and former Patriots linebacker Mike Vrabel, the organization rolls the dice on the Buckeye rugger. Finally, saving Alfonzo Dennard from his draft fall could pay huge dividends for New England. Once considered a 1st round talent who fell due to a less than stellar combine and a pre-draft run in with the law, the faller is great value. Great job on day one, decent day two, but left with few picks on day three.

Grade: B-

 

New York Jets

Round 1 (16) – DE Quinton Coples, North Carolina

Round 2 (43) – WR Stephen Hill, Goergia Tech

Round 3 (77) – LB Demario Davis, Arkansas State

Round 6 (187) – S Josh Bush, Wake Forest

Round 6 (202) – RB Terrance Ganaway, Baylor

Round 6 (203) – OG Robert Griffin, Baylor

Round 7 (242) – S Antonio Allen, South Carolina

Round 7 (244) – WR Jordan White, Western Michigan

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The Jets had multiple areas of need heading into the draft and for the most part, did a good job addressing those need spots. The team didn’t do much to bolster the pass rush from the outside linebacker position(s), but clearly project Quinton Coples to their vacant DE position well, opposite of 2011 1st round pick Muhammad Wilkerson. Interesting projection to say the least, we’ll see how it pans out — I, like many, viewed Coples solely as a 4-3 player only. Rounds 2 and 3 netted the Jets a pair of highly rated players. Stephen Hill fills a need opposite Santonio Holmes and should improve redzone efficiency. Davis improves the pass defense and overall quickness on defense. Both 6th round picks, S Josh Bush and RB Terrance Ganaway are nice fits and proper value where picked. Each should see some time on the field as rookies. 7th round selection S Antonio Allen is not without faults but, talent-wise, he should have gone earlier. Overall a solid haul, but we’ll have to see how Coples turns out, as the fate of this class revolves around him.

Grade: B-

 

Baltimore Ravens

Round 2 (35) – OLB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama

Round 2 (60) – OG Kelechi Osemele, Iowa State

Round 3 (84)  – RB Bernard Pierce, Temple

Round 4 (98) – OG Gino Gradkowski, Delaware

Round 4 (130) – S Christian Thompson, South Carolina State

Round 5 (169) – CB Asa Jackson, Cal Poly

Round 6 (198) – WR Tommy Streeter, Miami (FL)

Round 7 (236) – DT DeAngelo Tyson, Georgia

____________________

Top to bottom, Ravens GM Ozzie Newsome put together a strong class, yet again. You knew he’d wind up with one of the highly regarded Alabama defenders, being a native and alum of the state and school. The organization was able to move out of the 1st round and still not only get “their guy,” but also get a 1st round talent at a position of need in OLB Courtney Upshaw. Baltimore also lost some depth at guard with Ben Grubbs bolting in free agency, so the team managed to add talented, physical mauler in Kelechi Osemele. 4th round interior lineman Gino Gradkowski was a definite reach, but he has versatility and should provide a nice long-term project for the coaching staff, as will 4th round safety Christian Thompson, a nice size+speed prospect who gets physical downhill. 5th round corner Asa Jackson projects to be a capable slot-CB at the next level, and DeAngelo Tyson has quietly good movement skills and the necessary bulk to help in multiple spots along the DL. Above-average group of players for certain, but a handful from of this class isn’t capable of helping the Super Bowl contending Ravens for a year or two. Still, the team managed to consistently pluck talent.

Grade: B+

 

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 1 (17) – CB Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama

Round 1 (27) – OG Kevin Zeitler, Wisconsin

Round 2 (53) – DT Devon Still, Penn State

Round 3 (83) – WR Mohamed Sanu, Rutgers

Round 3 (93) – DT Brandon Thompson, Clemson

Round 4 (116) – TE Orson Charles, Georgia

Round 5 (156) – CB Shaun Prater, Iowa

Round 5 (166) – WR Marvin Jones, California

Round 5 (167) – S George Iloka, Boise State

Round 6 (191) – RB Dan Herron, Ohio State

____________________

Every draft starts at the top, and the Bengals were able to add two players — one on each side of the football — who should be plug & play starters for multiple years to come. CB Dre Kirkpatrick, a talented and physical boundary defender who can matchup with bigger receivers; OG Kevin Zeitler, a natural guard with polish and technique. Then from rounds 2-5 Cincinnati chose players who I graded a full round higher than what I where they were chosen — supreme value all around. 2nd rounder Devon Still and 3rd rounder Brandon Thompson are two stylistically different DTs that compliment each others game wonderfully. Devon Still a penetrating 3-tech, Thompson a bulky 4-3 nose tackle. Another 3rd round pick, Rutgers receiver Mo Sanu is a thickly built possession target who can play out wide, opposite A.J. Green early on, and 5th round receiver Marvin Jones has size and downfield speed. TE Orson Charles is a ‘joker’ / H-back target who has athleticism and short-area explosion to compliment Jermaine Gresham up the seam. A pair of 5th round DBs add quality depth, too: CB Shaun Prater has some polish and can be brought along slowly, and S George Iloka is a big bodied, in-the-box presence who, in time, can potentially match up well with big, fast NFL tight ends. The team’s final pick, 6th round runner Dan Herron was proper value where chosen, and he can be a capable rotational ‘back with some pop on contact. In my view, the top class of the 2012 NFL Draft, from start to finish.

Grade: A+

 

Cleveland Browns

Round 1 (3) – RB Trent Richardson, Alabama

Round 1 (22) – QB Brandon Weeden, Oklahoma State

Round 2 (37) – OT Mitchell Schwartz, California

Round 3 (87) – DT John Hughes, Cincinnati

Round 4 (100) – WR Travis Benjamin, Miami (FL)

Round 4 (120) – LB James-Michael Johnson, Nevada

Round 5 (160) – OG Ryan Miller, Colorado

Round 6 (204) – LB Emmanuel Acho, Texas

Round 6 (205) – DT Billy Winn, Boise State

Round 7 (245) – CB Trevin Wade, Arizona

Round 7 (247) – TE Brad Smelley, Alabama

____________________

Teams with many picks can typically generate good grades on quantity alone, and the Browns had many selections. Due to the volume of selections, Cleveland, in my view, did the right thing to move up and ensure themselves the right to select their man in Trent Richardson at No. 3 — the new focal point of their offense. Cleveland had a hole at right tackle and selected perhaps the top pure right tackle in the class in Mitchell Schwartz, a good fit. Not a fan of the Hughes and Benjamin picks based solely on value and what was still available, but the team came back and made really nice selections from then on. Lots of potential starters and contributors, most notably OG Ryan Miller and DT Billy Winn — two very solid selections. An inside (James-Michael Johnson) and outside (Emmanuel Acho) ‘backer adds some much needed depth and special teams presence. I was never a proponent of anyone taking Oklahoma State QB Brandon Weeden in round 1; I felt it was an unnecessary reach at No. 22 overall. Couple that with the fact that the team really didn’t do much in the way of adding immediate help at wide receiver and I think the Browns underachieved this year. The back-end of the class is impressive, but I was disappointed with the team’s inability to manipulate the draft to their advantage on day two with so many picks in their pocket and so much talent still available. Made a lot of picks in a draft that a lot of people thought wasn’t full of talent like it would be in other years.

Grade: C+/B-

 

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 1 (24) – OG David DeCastro, Stanford

Round 2 (56) – OT Mike Adams, Ohio State

Round 3 (86) – LB Sean Spence, Miami (FL)

Round 4 (109) – NT Alameda Ta’amu, Washington

Round 5 (159) – WR Chris Rainey, Florida

Round 7 (231) – WR Toney Clemons, Colorado

Round 7 (240) – TE David Paulson, Oregon

Round 7 (246) – CB Terrence Frederick, Texas A&M

Round 7 (248) – OG Kelvin Beachum, Southern Methodist

____________________

The Steelers quietly had a very solid draft. Very little movement up or down the board, so they didn’t receive a ton of buzz from pundits, but they were able to land multiple long-term starters without having to give up picks. The notable move they made was in round 4 to select big, athletic Washington nose tackle Alameda Ta’amu who could have gone much earlier if it weren’t for injury — potential day one starter, and if he develops better balance, he could be a force. In round 1, Pittsburgh had the draft’s top offensive guard fall to them, as David DeCastro should provide similar continuity and reliability from the LG spot to that of former Steeler great Alan Faneca. A round later, the Pittsburgh lucked out again, as a potential top 25 pick in left tackle Mike Adams slide into the team’s lap. Adams, a semi-troubled but highly talented player, has a very high ceiling if motivated. I don’t like the fit for LB Sean Spence in the middle of a 3-4 base front, but clearly someone the team projects to a spot down the road. Spence does have the ability to drop and cover. Versatile Chris Rainey will help out of the back-field, in the slot, and in the return game — it’ll be interesting to see if OC Todd Haley utilizes him better than he did Dexter McCluster in KC. 7th round CB Terrence Frederick and OG Kelvin Beachum were fantastic value picks and will make a good case to crack the final roster.

Grade: B+

 

Houston Texans

Round 1 (26) – OLB Whitney Mercilus, Illinois

Round 3 (68) – WR DeVier Posey, Ohio State

Round 3 (76) – OG Brandon Brooks, Miami (OH)

Round 4 (99) – C Ben Jones, Georgia

Round 4 (121) – WR Keshawn Martin, Michigan State

Round 4 (126) – DE Jared Crick, Nebraska

Round 5 (161) – K Randy Bullock, Texas A&M

Round 6 (195) – OT Nick Mondek, Purdue

____________________

I wasn’t thrilled with the Texans’ choice of receiver when they decided to address the position in round 3 with DeVier Posey given what was available. A decent projection prospect with size+speed appeal, but he’s raw and may not help much immediately. However, in round 1 Houston bolstered its pass rush with the addition of Whitney Mercilus — who should do wonders under the tutelage of DC Wade Phillips. Miami (OH) guard Brandon Brooks is big, strong, and athletic enough to help at either guard spot and perhaps occasionally even at right tackle. 4th round C Ben Jones adds some depth behind veteran snapper Chris Meyers and can work into a guard spot as well. The other pair of 4th round selections were some of my favorite in the draft: WR Keshawn Martin may wind up being better than DeVier Posey in both the short & long term, and DE Jared Crick is a long armed rusher with pass rush skills and movement with some similarities to J.J. Watt — ideal fit as a 3-4 DE in Houston. Randy Bullock, the hometown kicker, should provide some stability at the position most figured would be addressed on day three for the Texans. An above-average class with starting caliber players sprinkled in the mid-rounds.

Grade: B

 

Indianapolis Colts

Round 1 (1) – QB Andrew Luck, Stanford

Round 2 (34) – TE Coby Fleener, Stanford

Round 3 (64) – TE Dwayne Allen, Clemson

Round 3 (92) – WR T.Y. Hilton, Florida International

Round 5 (136) – NT Josh Chapman, Alabama

Round 5 (170) – RB Vick Ballard, Mississippi State

Round 6 (206) – WR LaVon Brazill, Ohio

Round 7 (208) – OG Justin Anderson, Georgia

Round 7 (214) – LB Tim Fugger, Vanderbilt

Round 7 (253) – QB Chandler Harnish, Northern Illinois

____________________

Andrew Luck is the real deal, and building this draft, in addition to the team as a whole, was imperative — and in my view, they did a good job in that regard. Adding a familiar target for Luck in Coby Fleener who can move around, get up the seam, and make catches all over the field from the H-back/TE spot is a nice value pick. The team came back in round 3 and grabbed a more natural on-the-line ‘Y’ TE in Dwayne Allen, who has short-area explosion and pass catching ability. Next was FIU speedster T.Y. Hilton, who can catch + run very well and get down-field in a hurry. 5th round NT Josh Chapman was a fantastic selection and, if healthy, he can very easily be the starting in the middle of new head coach Chuck Pagano’s 3-4 DL. Another 5th rounder, RB Vick Ballard also provides more depth and his game translates well to the next level — he could push for carries fairly early on. 6th rounder LaVon Brazill is another player who, if healthy, can impact early. A sleeper from the 2012 class, Brazill runs routes well, can separate, and has reliable hands. I’d have preferred the team to address the receiver position a little earlier then the end of round 3, but they added targets all around for Andrew Luck. A nice class to build on moving forward.

Grade: B+

 

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 1 (5) – WR Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Round 2 (38) – DE Andre Branch, Clemson

Round 3 (70) – P Bryan Anger, California

Round 5 (142) – LB Brandon Marshall, Nevada

Round 6 (176) – CB Mike Harris, Florida State

Round 7 (228) – DT Jeris Pendleton, Ashland

____________________

The thing I liked about the Jaguars draft is right off the bat, they identified a primary need and were able to address it in a legitimate, impactful way. Parlaying 4th round pick to add the draft’s safest receiver, who possesses definite #1 WR capabilities is a minute price to pay. The team came back in round two to add a potential 1st round caliber player at another position of need in DE Andre Branch. I also quietly liked the selection of Florida State cornerback Mike Harris in round 6; a versatile player who should vie for time as a nickel-CB early on. 5th and 7th round defenders Brandon Marshall and Jeris Pendleton are projection players who are unlikely to help much on defense as rookies, and obviously you must very much question why a team that’s far from complete would pass on multiple value positional players in favor of a punter in the third round.

Grade: B-

 

Tennessee Titans

Round 1 (20) – WR Kendall Wright, Baylor

Round 2 (52) – LB Zach Brown, North Carolina

Round 3 (82) – DT Mike Martin, Michigan

Round 4 (115) – CB Coty Sensabaugh, Clemson

Round 5 (145) – TE Taylor Thompson, Southern Methodist

Round 6 (190) – S Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State

Round 7 (211) – DE Scott Soloman, Rice

____________________

Tennessee went off the board a but in round 1 to select Baylor wide receiver Kendall Wright and add some more explosiveness to the offense for the long-haul. A nice compliment to a bigger, athletic Kenny Britt. Rounds 2 and 3 should provide the team with starters, as Zach Brown is a nice fit to shore up the WILL-LB spot long-term, and in time Mike Martin looks the part of a compact and strong squatty 4-3 NT who plays with leverage. Coty Sensabaugh adds more speed and matchup ability in the Tennessee secondary, and 6th round safety Markelle Martin has talent that very much outweighs his draft position. 5th round TE Taylor Thompson and 7th round DE Scott Soloman are quality projection players who could contribute down the road; especially Thompson. Titans could have been better served to add a rush end earlier, but they put together a nice class.

Grade: B+

 

Denver Broncos

Round 2 (36) – DT Derek Wolfe, Cincinnati

Round 2 (57) – QB Brock Osweiler, Arizona State

Round 3 (67) – RB Ronnie Hillman, San Diego State

Round 4 (101) – CB Omar Bolden, Arizona State

Round 4 (108) – C Philip Blake, Baylor

Round 5 (137) – DE Malik Jackson, Tennessee

Round 6 (188) – LB Danny Trevathan, Kentucky

___________________

I didn’t mind that the Broncos didn’t add more weapons for Peyton Manning early on, and I don’t mind in the least bit that they opted to choose their developmental, QB of the future hopeful. However, I was a little disappointed that they opted for DT Derek Wolfe over both Jerel Worthy and Devon Still at No. 36; Wolfe is a quality player, but doesn’t possess the same upside as those he was chosen before. Brock Osweiler is in a good situation and can be brought along slowly while learning from #18. While I do like both Ronnie Hillman and Omar Bolden, they were taken a touch high for my liking, and ahead of other players rated a little higher; although both are good fits. C Philip Blake is a solid, proper value fit and definitely looks the part of a future starter. 5th rounder Malik Jackson is a versatile player with the ability to play in rotation all along the defensive line. A decent overall class that lacks a few value selections and some more need players, but talent has certainly been added.

Grade: B-

 

Kansas City Chiefs

Round 1 (11) – DT Dontari Poe, Memphis

Round 2 (44) – G/T Jeff Allen, Illinois

Round 3 (74) – OT Donald Stephenson, Oklahoma

Round 4 (107) – WR Devon Wylie, Fresno State

Round 5 (146) – DB DeQuan Menzie, Alabama

Round 6 (182) – RB Cyrus Gray, Texas A&M

Round 7 (218) – DT Jerome Long, San Diego State

Round 7 (238) – WR Junior Hemingway, Michigan

____________________

Beginning at the top, I question whether or not Dontari Poe is a true 3-4 space eating NT, despite his dimensions suggesting he can be. Despite the lack of clarity, I still believe he is a very capable 3-4 DL and has a good future ahead of him if the coaching staff is patient and Poe has the drive to learn. Round 2 netted the Chiefs OG Jeff Allen, a college OT who has higher upside if kicked to the interior; good pick, albeit a touch early. 3rd round OT Donald Stephenson is an athletic blocker with good lateral quickness who will add depth as a swing-tackle. 4th round receiver Devon Wylie perhaps reminds GM Scott Pioli of Wes Welker; speedy+shifty slot-receiver with upper echelon route running skills. 5th round DB DeQuan Menzie is an intelligent football player with CB/S versatility and RB Cyrus Gray was a very nice value in the 6th. WR Junior Hemingway could prove to be a bit of a steal as a very late 7th round pick; size and natural talent should have ensured his name would be called a slight bit earlier.

Grade: B

 

Oakland Raiders

Round 3 (95) – OG Tony Bergstrom, Utah

Round 4 (129) – LB Miles Burris, San Diego State

Round 5 (158) – DE Jack Crawford, Penn State

Round 5 (168) – WR Juron Criner, Arizona

Round 6 (189) – DT Christo Bilukidi, Georgia State

Round 7 (230) – LB Nate Stupar, Penn State

____________________

The Raiders earlier selections consisted of compensatory picks, and overall the team had very little to work with after shipping out their day 1 and 2 picks. That being said, I feel the organization’s done a good job adding long-term starters along the OL with Stefan Wisniewski in last year’s draft and Mike Brisiel in free agency this year. Oakland continued to build up front by making Utah OG Tony Bergstrom its first pick in 2012; a polished player with good size and quickness who could perhaps contribute at tackle as well. LB Miles Burris is an interesting player who may need a little development time but can be a starter down the road. I really liked the 5th round pair the Raiders added: DE Jack Crawford is a little raw and inexperienced, but has a quietly high ceiling; WR Juron Criner would have been a proper third-round value selection and if he develops the ability to separate, he can be a very capable #2 receiver out-wide. 6th round DT Christo Bilukidi is an intriguing talent with a nice frame who will offer the coaching staff a nice project if he cracks the roster. 7th round linebacker Nate Stupar is intelligent and has notable NFL bloodlines; he will make the roster as a rookie if he can be a special team impact. Few picks, but some good values — but hard to give a high grade to a team without early picks.

Grade: B-

 

San Diego Chargers

Round 1 (18) – OLB Melvin Ingram, South Carolina

Round 2 (49) – DE Kendall Reyes, UConn

Round 3 (73) – S Brandon Taylor, LSU

Round 4 (110) – TE Ladarius Green, Louisiana-Lafayette

Round 5 (149) – OG Johnnie Troutman, Penn State

Round 7 (226) – C David Molk, Michigan

Round  7 (250) – RB Edwin Baker, Michigan State

____________________

The Chargers put together a strong class from start to finish. From the top, the team was able to catch a true talent at a position of need who shouldn’t have been made available in the late teens with Melvin Ingram — a disruptive pass rusher with leverage and a variety of rushing moves who can contribute immediately. Similar can be said of 2nd round pick Kendall Reyes, a nice fit as a 3-4 end who certainly surprised San Diego with his availability at No. 49 on the second day of the draft. The team made a small move in order to trade up for S Brandon Taylor, a player with some polish who can help out early on in a position of notable need. Round 4, the team opted to add one of the better players available in H-back/TE Ladarius Green, a good mover with natural hands; he should fit right into the teams spread-out passing offense. 5th round OG Johnnie Troutman could miss the 2012 season due to an injury the team knew about, which tells you just how much they liked him — Troutman is a big-bodied, athletic guard. Finally, in the 7th, the team select falling Michigan C David Molk, a squatty but strong interior blocker who could step in and help as a rookie. One of the last picks of the draft, RB Edwin Baker, is another intriguing pick who could surprise many who passed on him if he cracks the final roster — he possesses one-cut ability and would fit in well.

Grade: B

 

Follow me on Twitter: @NFLDraftUpdate

-DC

Tagged ,

Complete 2012 NFL Draft Classes for all 32 Teams + UDFA list

Here you will find a compete list of all 32 teams’ 2012 NFL Draft classes and subsequent undrafted free agent signings list:

 

Buffalo Bills

Round 1 (10) – CB Stephon Gilmore, South Carolina

Round 2 (41) – G/T Cordy Glenn, Georgia

Round 3 (69) – WR T.J. Graham, NC State

Round 4 (105) – LB Nigel Bradham, Florida State

Round 4 (124) – CB Ron Brooks, LSU

Round 5 (144) – OT Zebrie Sanders, Florida State

Round 5 (147) – LB Tank Carder, TCU

Round 6 (178) – OG Mark Asper, Oregon

Round 7 (251) – K John Potter, Western Michigan

********************

Delano Howell, S, Stanford
Nick Sukay, S, Penn State
Shawn Powell, P, Florida State
Ian Wild, S, Mercyhurst
Chris Douglas, RB, Missouri St
Aaron Corp, QB, Richmond
Chris Hill, CB, Virginia Tech
Garrick Williams, OLB, Texas A&M
Paul Madsen, OL, Colorado St
David Snow, C, Texas

 

 

Miami Dolphins

Round 1 (8) – QB Ryan Tannehill, Texas A&M

Round 2 (42) – OT Jonathan Martin, Stanford

Round 3 (72) – DE Olivier Vernon, Miami (FL)

Round 3 (78) – TE Michael Egnew, Missouri

Round 4 (97) – RB Lamar Miller, Miami (FL)

Round 5 (155) – LB Josh Kaddu, Oregon

Round 6 (183) – WR B.J. Cunningham, Michigan State

Round 7 (215) – DT Kheeston Randall, Texas

Round 7 (227) – WR Rishard Matthews, Nevada

********************

Jacquies Smith, DE, Missouri
Jonas Gray, RB, Notre Dame
Derrick Shelby, DE, Utah
Derek Moye, WR, Penn State
Kelcie McCray, S, Arkansas State
Jeff Fuller, WR, Texas A&M
Derrick Dennis, OL, Temple
Albert Evans, S, Purdue
Shelly Lyons, LB, Arizona State
Jarrell Root, DE, Boise St
Derrick Shelby, DE/OLB, Utah
Josh Samuda, OL, UMass
Terence Brown, OL, BYU
Dustin Waldron, OT, Portland State
Myron Johnson, S, Arkansas Tech
Kevin Scott, CB, Syracuse
Kelvin Bolden, WR, Southern Miss
Jacory Harris, QB, Miami (FL) – (Invite)

 

 

New England Patriots

Round 1 (21) – DE Chandler Jones, Syracuse

Round 1 (25) – LB Dont’a Hightower, Alabama

Round 2 (48) – S Tavon Wilson, Illinois

Round 3 (90) – DE Jake Bequette, Arkansas

Round 6 (197) – DB Nate Ebner, Ohio State

Round 7 (224) – CB Alfonzo Dennard, Nebraska

Round 7 (235) – WR Jeremy Ebert, Northwestern

********************

Jeremiah Warren, OL, South Florida
Markus Zusevics, OT, Iowa
Marcus Forston, DT, Miami
Brad Herman, TE, Iowa
Matt Roark, WR, Kentucky

 

 

New York Jets

Round 1 (16) – DE Quinton Coples, North Carolina

Round 2 (43) – WR Stephen Hill, Goergia Tech

Round 3 (77) – LB Demario Davis, Arkansas State

Round 6 (187) – S Josh Bush, Wake Forest

Round 6 (202) – RB Terrance Ganaway, Baylor

Round 6 (203) – OG Robert Griffin, Baylor

Round 7 (242) – S Antonio Allen, South Carolina

Round 7 (244) – WR Jordan White, Western Michigan

********************

Damon Harrison, DT, William Penn
Ryan Steed, CB, Furman
Brett Roy, DE, Nevada
G.J. Kinne, QB, Tulsa
Brian Linthicum, TE, Michigan State
Donovan Robinson, DE, Jackson St
Brody McKnight, K, Montana
John Cullen, OT, Utah
D’Anton Lynn, CB, Penn State
Donovan Robinson, LB, SC State
Marcus Dowtin, LB, Northern Alabama
Donnie Fletcher, CB, Boston College
Pashaun Brown, RB, Maine
Anthony Parker, OT Western Michigan
Josue Ortiz, DL, Harvard (Invite)

 

 

Baltimore Ravens

Round 2 (35) – OLB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama

Round 2 (60) – OG Kelechi Osemele, Iowa State

Round 3 (84)  – RB Bernard Pierce, Temple

Round 4 (98) – OG Gino Gradkowski, Delaware

Round 4 (130) – S Christian Thompson, South Carolina State

Round 5 (169) – CB Asa Jackson, Cal Poly

Round 6 (198) – WR Tommy Streeter, Miami (FL)

Round 7 (236) – DT DeAngelo Tyson, Georgia

********************

John Brantley, QB, Florida
Charles Brown, CB, North Carolina
Austin Johnson, LB, Tennessee
Chyl Quarles, S, Wake Forest
Nick Jean-Baptiste, DT, Baylor
Deonte Thompson, WR, Florida
Nick Provo, TE, Syracuse
Devin Goda, WR, Slippery Rock
Chris Anzevino, C, Kent State
Chad Diehl, FB, Clemson
Antoine McClain, OL, Clemson
Bruce Figgins, FB, Georgia
Bobby Rainey, RB, Western Kentucky
Jack Cornell, G/T, Illinois
Ishmaa’ily Kitchen, DT, Kent State
Elliot Henigan, DT, UAB
Alfred McCullough, OL, Alabama
Dorian Graham, WR, Syracuse
James Carmon OL Mississippi State
Justin Tucker, K, Texas

 

 

Cincinnati Bengals

Round 1 (17) – CB Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama

Round 1 (27) – OG Kevin Zeitler, Wisconsin

Round 2 (53) – DT Devon Still, Penn State

Round 3 (83) – WR Mohamed Sanu, Rutgers

Round 3 (93) – DT Brandon Thompson, Clemson

Round 4 (116) – TE Orson Charles, Georgia

Round 5 (156) – CB Shaun prater, Iowa

Round 5 (166) – WR Marvin Jones, California

Round 5 (167) – S George Iloka, Boise State

Round 6 (191) – RB Dan Herron, Ohio State

*******************

Julian Miller, DE, West Virginia
Justin Hinton, WR, Indiana St
Vontaze Burfict, LB, Arizona State
Tony Dye, S, UCLA
Derrius Brooks, CB, Western Kentucky
Brandon Joiner, DE, Arkansas St
Kashif Moore, WR, UConn
Tyler Hansen, QB, Colorado
Rodney Stewart, RB, Colorado
Bubba Forrest, S, New Mexico
Emmanuel Lamur, LB/S, Kansas State
Ben Bojicic, OL, Bowling Green
Taveon Rogers, WR, New Mexico State

 

 

Cleveland Browns

Round 1 (3) – RB Trent Richardson, Alabama

Round 1 (22) – QB Brandon Weeden, Oklahoma State

Round 2 (37) – OT Mitchell Schwartz, California

Round 3 (87) – DT John Hughes, Cincinnati

Round 4 (100) – WR Travis Benjamin, Miami (FL)

Round 4 (120) – LB James-Michael Johnson, Nevada

Round 5 (160) – OG Ryan Miller, Colorado

Round 6 (204) – LB Emmanuel Acho, Texas

Round 6 (205) – DT Billy Winn, Boise State

Round 7 (245) – CB Trevin Wade, Arizona

Round 7 (247) – TE Brad Smelley, Alabama

********************

Josh Cooper, WR, Oklahoma State
Jermaine Saffold, WR, Missouri State
Andrew Sweat, LB, Ohio State
Matt Cleveland, OT, Idaho
Antwuan Reed, CB, Pittsburgh
J.B. Shugarts, OT/OG, Ohio State
William Green, DE, Florida
Tashaun Gipson, S, Wyoming
Garth Gerhart, OG/C, Arizona State
Bert Reed, WR, Florida State
Emanuel Davis, CB, East Carolina
Mike Allen, CB, James Madison
Johnson Bademosi, S, Stanford
L.J. Fort, LB, Northern Iowa

 

 

Pittsburgh Steelers

Round 1 (24) – OG David DeCastro, Stanford

Round 2 (56) – OT Mike Adams, Ohio State

Round 3 (86) – LB Sean Spence, Miami (FL)

Round 4 (109) – NT Alameda Ta’amu, Washington

Round 5 (159) – WR Chris Rainey, Florida

Round 7 (231) – WR Toney Clemons, Colorado

Round 7 (240) – TE David Paulson, Oregon

Round 7 (246) – CB Terrence Frederick, Texas A&M

Round 7 (248) – OG Kelvin Beachum, Southern Methodist

********************

Brandon Lindsey, LB, Pittsburgh
Drew Butler, P, Georgia
Robert Golden, DB, Arizona
Marquis Maze, WR, Alabama
Desmond Stapleton, OG, Rutgers
Adrian Robinson, DE, Temple
Alex Tanney, QB, Monmouth
Grant Ressel, K, Missouri
Ryan Lee, OG, Furman
Jake Stoller, DL, Yale
Connor Dixon, WR, Duquesne

 

 

Houston Texans

Round 1 (26) – OLB Whitney Mercilus, Illinois

Round 3 (68) – WR DeVier Posey, Ohio State

Round 3 (76) – OG Brandon Brooks, Miami (OH)

Round 4 (99) – C Ben Jones, Georgia

Round 4 (121) – WR Keshawn Martin, Michigan State

Round 4 (126) – DE Jared Crick, Nebraska

Round 5 (161) – K Randy Bullock, Texas A&M

Round 6 (195) – OT Nick Mondek, Purdue

*******************

Desmond Marrow, S, Toledo
Jerrell Jackson, WR, Missouri
Shawn Loiseau, LB, Merrimack
DJ Bryant, DE, James Madison
Case Keenum, QB, Houston
Logan Brock, TE, TCU
Mario Louis, WR, Grambling State
Nate Menkin, OT, Mary Hardin-Baylor
Davin Meggett, RB, Maryland
Cody White, OT, Illinois State
Jason Ford, RB, Illinois
Hebron ‘Loni’ Fangupo, DT, BYU
Dwight Jones, WR, North Carolina
Eddie Pleasant, S, Oregon
Delano Johnson, DE/OLB, Bowie State
David Hunter, DT, Houston
Tracy Robertson, DT, Baylor
Johnathan Grimes, RB, William and Mary
Greg Williams, LB, Pittsburgh
Rennie Moore, DT Clemson
Phillip Supernaw, TE, Ouchita Baptist

 

 

Indianapolis Colts

Round 1 (1) – QB Andrew Luck, Stanford

Round 2 (34) – TE Coby Fleener, Stanford

Round 3 (64) – TE Dwayne Allen, Clemson

Round 3 (92) – WR T.Y. Hilton, Florida International

Round 5 (136) – NT Josh Chapman, Alabama

Round 5 (170) – RB Vick Ballard, Mississippi State

Round 6 (206) – WR LaVon Brazill, Ohio

Round 7 (208) – OG Justin Anderson, Georgia

Round 7 (214) – LB Tim Fugger, Vanderbilt

Round 7 (253) – QB Chandler Harnish, Northern Illinois

*******************

Micah Pellerin CB, Hampton
Jabin Sambrano, WR, Montana
Cameron Chism, CB, Maryland
Buddy Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh
Chris Galippo, LB, USC
Matt Merletti, S, North Carolina
Griff Whalen, WR, Stanford
Antonio Fenelus, CB, Wisconsin
Jason Foster, OL, Rhode Island
Brian Stahovich, P, San Diego State
Hayworth Hicks, OL, Iowa State
Steven Baker, OL, East Carolina
Kevin Eagan, DE, Endicott
James Aiono, DT, Utah

 

 

Jacksonville Jaguars

Round 1 (5) – WR Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State

Round 2 (38) – DE Andre Branch, Clemson

Round 3 (70) – P Bryan Anger, California

Round 5 (142) – LB Brandon Marshall, Nevada

Round 6 (176) – CB Mike Harris, Florida State

Round 7 (228) – DT Jeris Pendleton, Ashland

********************

Drew Nowak, DT, Western Michigan
Kevin Elliot, WR, Florida A&M
Lee Barbiasz, OT, Northern Colorado
Dontell Johnson, DB, Murray State
J.K. Schaffer, LB, Cincinnati
Ryan Davis, DE, Bethune-Cookman
Matt Veldman, TE, North Dakota State
Antonio Dennard, CB, Langston
Mike Brewster, C, Ohio State
Jarrett Boykin, WR, Virginia Tech
Long Ding, K, Norwich
Joe Banyard, RB, UTEP
Donovan Richard, S, South Carolina State
Taylor Allen, TE, Endicott
Raymond Carter, RB, Colorado State
Nelson Rosario, WR, UCLA
Chris Forcier, WR, Furman (Invite)
Dan Hoch, OL, Missouri (Invite)

 

 

Tennessee Titans

Round 1 (20) – WR Kendall Wright, Baylor

Round 2 (52) – LB Zach Brown, North Carolina

Round 3 (82) – DT Mike Martin, Michigan

Round 4 (115) – CB Coty Sensabaugh

Round 5 (145) – TE Taylor Thompson, Southern Methodist

Round 6 (190) – S Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State

Round 7 (211) – DE Scott Soloman, Rice

********************

DJ Woods, WR, Cincinnati
Devin Aguilar, WR, Washington
Christian Scott, S, Texas
Alex Watkins, LB, Alabama
Nick Stephens, QB, Tarleton State
Chandler Burden, OL, Kentucky
DaJohn Harris, DT, USC
William Vlachos, C, Alabama
Beau Brinkley, LS, MIssouri
LaQuinton Evans, WR, Southern
Brandon Barden, TE, Vanderbilt
Darryl Whiting, RB, Fordham
Gary Wilburn, CB, UConn
Chase Deadder, WR, Sacramento State
George Bias, OG, Stephen F. Austin

 

 

Denver Broncos

Round 2 (36) – DT Derek Wolfe, Cincinnati

Round 2 (57) – QB Brock Osweiler, Arizona State

Round 3 (67) – RB Ronnie Hillman, San Diego State

Round 4 (101) – CB Omar Bolden, Arizona State

Round 4 (108) – C Philip Blake, Baylor

Round 5 (137) – DE Malik Jackson, Tennessee

Round 6 (188) – LB Danny Trevathan, Kentucky

*******************

Duke Ihenacho, S, San Jose State
Steven Johnson, LB, Kansas
Austin Wuebbels, OG, Missouri
Gerell Robinson, WR, Arizona State
Coryell Judie, CB, Texas A&M
Jerry Franklin, LB, Arkansas
Wayne Tribue, OL, Temple
Elliot Coffey, LB, Baylor
Anthony Miller, TE, California
Jamie Blatnick, DE, Oklahoma State
Mike Remmers, OT, Oregon State
Eric Page, WR, Toledo
Demario Pippen, RB, Tuskegee

 

 

Kansas City Chiefs

Round 1 (11) – DT Dontari Poe, Memphis

Round 2 (44) – G/T Jeff Allen, Illinois

Round 3 (74) – OT Donald Stephenson, Oklahoma

Round 4 (107) – WR Devon Wylie, Fresno State

Round 5 (146) – DB DeQuan Menzie, Alabama

Round 6 (182) – RB Cyrus Gray, Texas A&M

Round 7 (218) – DT Jerome Long, San Diego State

Round 7 (238) – WR Junior Hemingway, Michigan

********************

Tysyn Hartman, S, Kansas State
Justin Cheadle, OG, Cal
Nate Eachus, RB, Colgate
Josh Bellamy, WR, Louisville
Brandon Kinnie, WR, Nebraska
Jean Fanor, S, Bethune-Cookman
Taylor Gentry, FB, NC State
Terrance Parks, S, Florida State
Tim Biere, TE, Kansas
Neiko Thorpe, DB, Auburn
Ethan Johnson, DE, Notre Dame
Dexter Heymen, LB, Lousiville
Cam Holland, OL, North Carolina
David LeGree, QB, Hampton
Dominique Ellis, CB, SC State
James Winchester, LS, Oklahoma

 

 

Oakland Raiders

Round 3 (95) – OG Tony Bergstrom, Utah

Round 4 (129) – LB Miles Burris, San Diego State

Round 5 (158) – DE Jack Crawford, Penn State

Round 5 (168) – WR Juron Criner, Arizona

Round 6 (189) – DT Christo Bilukidi, Georgia State

Round 7 (230) – LB Nate Stupar, Penn State

********************

Marquette King, P, Fort Valley State
Aaron Henry, S, Wisconsin
Dominique Hamilton, DT, Missouri
Chaz Powell, CB/WR, Penn State
Thomas Mayo, WR, Cal (PA)
Lucas Nix, OG, Pittsburgh
Conroy Black, CB, Utah
Dan Knapp, OL, Arizona State
Derek Carrier, TE, Beloit
Mario Kurn, LB, San Diego
Kaelin Burnett, DE, Nevada
Brandon Carswell, WR, USC
Rod Streater, WR, Temple
Raphael Guidry, DT, Kansas State
Corey Gatewood, CB, Stanford
Darius Nall, DE, UCF (Invite)

 

 

San Diego Chargers

Round 1 (18) – OLB Melvin Ingram, South Carolina

Round 2 (49) – DE Kendall Reyes, UConn

Round 3 (73) – S Brandon Taylor, LSU

Round 4 (110) – TE Ladarius Green, Louisiana-Lafayette

Round 5 (149) – OG Johnnie Troutman, Penn State

Round 7 (226) – C David Molk, Michigan

Round  7 (250) – RB Edwin Baker, Michigan State

********************

Phillip Payne, WR, Nevada-Las Vegas
Michael Hayes, RB, Houston
Jarrett Lee, QB, LSU
Josh Linam, LB, Central Florida
De’Andre Presley, WR, Appalachian State
Eddie Brown, DT, Texas A&M
Paul Cox, WR, Miss Valley State
Christian Tupou, DT, USC
Mike Harris, OG, UCLA
Taylor Embree, WR, UCLA
Kyle Martens, P, Rice
Logan Harrell, DT, Fresno State
Mike Willie, WR, Arizona State
Sean Cattouse, S, California
Cordell Bell, OG, Mississippi State
Hubert Anyiam, WR, Oklahoma State
Nick Guess, LS, Tennessee
Charles Burton, G/T, Montana
Jason Barnes, WR, South Carolina
Greg Gatson, CB, Arkansas

 

 

Dallas Cowboys

Round 1 (6) – CB Morris Claiborne, LSU

Round 3 (81) – DE Tyrone Crawford, Boise State

Round 4 (113) – OLB Kyle Wilber, Wake Forest

Round 4 (135) – S Matt Johnson, Eastern Washington

Round 5 (152) – WR Danny Coale, Virginia Tech

Round 6 (186) – TE James Hanna, Oklahoma

Round 7 (222) – LB Caleb McSurdy, Montana

********************

Darrell Scott, RB, South Florida
Troy Woolfolk, CB, Michigan
Ronald Leary, OG, Memphis
Jeff Adams, OT, Columbia
Taylor Dever, OT, Notre Dame
Adrian Hamilton, DE, Prairie View A&M
Aston Whiteside, LB, Abilene Christian
Levy Adcock, OT, Oklahoma State
Eddie Whitley, S, Virginia Tech
George Bryan, TE, North Carolina State
Andrew Szcerba, TE, Penn State
Isaac Madison, CB, Arkansas
Lionel Smith, CB, Texas A&M
Lance Dunbar, RB, North Texas
Cole Beasley, WR, Southern Methodist
Tyrone Novikoff, OT, Idaho
Charley Hughlett, LS, Central Florida

 

 

New York Giants

Round 1 (32) – RB David Wilson, Virginia Tech

Round 2 (63) – WR Rueben Randle, LSU

Round 3 (94) – CB Jayron Hosley, Virginia Tech

Round 4 (127) – TE Adrien Robinson, Cincinnati

Round 4 (131) – OT Brandon Mosley, Auburn

Round 6 (201) – OT Matt McCants, Alabama-Birmingham

Round 7 (239) – DT Markus Kuhn, North Carolina State

********************

Janzen Jackson, S, McNeese State
Matt Broha, DE, Louisiana Tech
Damian Davis, WR, Mary Hardin-Baylor
David Douglas, WR, Arizona
Adewale Ojomo, DE, Miami (FL)
Julian Talley, WR, UMass
Joe Martinek, FB/RB, Rutgers
Jojo Nicolas, S, Miami
D’Angelo McCray, OL, Memphis
Stephen Goodin, OG, Nebraska-Kearney

 

 

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 1 (12) – DT Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State

Round 2 (46) – LB Mychal Kendricks, California

Round 2 (59) – DE Vinny Curry, Marshall

Round 3 (88) – QB Nick Foles, Arizona

Round 4 (123) – CB Brandon Boykin, Georgia

Round 5 (153) – OT Dennis Kelly, Purdue

Round 6 (194) – WR Marvin McNutt, Iowa

Round 6 (200) – OG Brandon Washington, Miami (FL)

Round 7 (229) – RB Bryce Brown, Kansas State

********************

Cliff Harris, CB, Oregon
Phillip Thomas, DB, Syracuse
Emil Igwenagu, FB/TE, UMass
Matt Camilli, LS, UTEP
Damaris Johnson, WR, Tulsa
Chris Polk, RB, Washington
Chase Ford, TE, Miami

 

 

Washington Redskins

Round 1 (2) – QB Robert Griffin III, Baylor

Round 3 (71) – OG Josh LeRibeus, Southern Methodist

Round 4 (102) – QB Kirk Cousins, Michigan State

Round 4 (119) – LB Keenan Robinson, Texas

Round 5 (141) – OG Adam Gettis, Iowa

Round 6 (173) – RB Alfred Morris, Florida Atlantic

Round 6 (193) – OT Tom Compton, North Dakota

Round 7 (213) – CB Richard Crawford, Southern Methodist

Round 7 (217) – CB Jordan Bernstine, Iowa

*******************

Eain Smith, S, West Virginia
Michael Shaw, RB, Michigan
Chase Minnifield, CB, Virginia
Lance Lewis, WR, East Carolina
Brian McNally, DE, New Hampshire
Darius Hanks, WR, Alabama
Lennon Creer, RB, Louisiana Tech
Vaughn Meatoga, DT, Hawaii
D.J. Holt, LB, California
Grant Garner, C, Oklahoma State
Kerby Long, WR, James Madison
Josh Oglesby, OL, Wisconsin
Marcus Hyde, DE, William & Mary (Invite)

 

 

Chicago Bears

Round 1 (19) – DE Shea McClellin, Boise State

Round 2 (45) – WR Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina

Round 3 (79) – S Brandon Hardin, Oregon State

Round 4 (111) – FB/TE Evan Rodriguez, Temple

Round 6 (184) – CB Isaiah Frey, Nevada

Round 7 (220) – CB Greg McCoy, TCU

*******************

Ronnie Cameron, DT, Old Dominion
James Brown, OG, Troy
Trevor Coston, S, Maine
Chris Summers, WR, Liberty
Jake Anderson, OT, Akron
Ronnie Thornton, LB, Southern Miss
Adrien Cole, LB, Louisiana Tech
Tyler Holmes, LB, UMass
Kyle Wojta, LS, Wisconsin
Alvester Alexander, RB, Wyoming
Adonis Thomas, RB, Toledo (Invite)

 

 

Detroit Lions

Round 1 (23) – OT Riley Reiff, Iowa

Round 2 (54) – WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma

Round 3 (85) – CB Dwight Bentley, Louisiana-Lafayette

Round 4 (125) – DE/OLB Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma

Round 5 (138) – LB Tahir Whitehead, Temple

Round 5 (148) – CB Chris Greenwood, Albion

Round 6 (196) – CB Jonte Green, New Mexico State

Round 7 (223) – LB Travis Lewis, Oklahoma

********************

Derek Dimke, K, Illinois
Kellen Moore, QB, Boise State
Patrick Edwards, WR, Houston
J.C. Oram, OG, Weber St
Rodney Austin, OG, Elon
Carmen Messina, LB, New Mexico
Ronnie Sneed, LB, Kentucky
Quinn Barham, OL, Penn St
Jared Karstetter, WR, Washington State
Michael Cosgrove, DT, Idaho
Monte Lewis, DE, Jacksonville State
Sam Proctor, S, Oklahoma
Alex Gottlieb, TE, William & Mary

 

 

Green Bay Packers

Round 1 (28) – OLB Nick Perry, USC

Round 2 (51) – DE Jerel Worthy, Michigan State

Round 2 (62) – CB Casey Hayward, Vanderbilt

Round 4 (132) – DT Mike Daniels, Iowa

Round 4 (133) – S Jeron McMillian, Maine

Round 5 (163) – LB Terrell Manning, North Carolina State

Round 7 (241) – OT Andrew Datko, Florida State

Round 7 (243) – QB B.J. Coleman, Tennessee-Chattanooga

********************

Dale Moss, WR, South Dakota State
Darius Reynolds, WR, Iowa State
Sean Richardson, S, Vanderbilt
Marcus Rivers, WR, Buffalo
Nic Cooper, RB, Winston-Salem
Eric Lair, TE, Minnesota
Randy Colling, NT, Gannon
Dezman Moses, DE, Tulane
Dion Turner, DB, Southern Utah
Marc Tyler, RB, USC
Tommie Draheim, OL, San Diego State
Duane Bennett, RB, Minnesota
Cameron Ford, TE, Wake Forest
Don Barclay, OL, West Virginia
Drew Vanderlin, TE, Michigan Tech
David Nadeau, K, Minn-Duluth (Invite)

 

 

Minnesota Vikings

Round 1 (4) – OT Matt Kalil, USC

Round 1 (29) – S Harrison Smith, Notre Dame

Round 3 (66) – CB Josh Robinson, Central Florida

Round 4 (118) – WR Jarius Wright, Arkansas

Round 4 (128) – FB/TE Rhett Ellison, USC

Round 4 (134) – WR Greg Childs, Arkansas

Round 5 (139) – DB Robert Blanton, Notre Dame

Round 6 (175) – K Blair Walsh, Georgia

Round 7 (210) – LB Audie Cole, North Carolina State

Round 7 (219) – DL Trevor Guyton, California

*******************

Bobby Felder, CB, Nicholls St
Quentin Saulsberry, C, Mississippi State
Darrion Weems, OL, Oregon
Chase Baker, DT, Boise State
Derrick Coleman, RB, UCLA
Tydreke Powell, DT, North Carolina
Kevin Cyrille, DE, Florida Atlantic
Kamar Jorden, WR, Bowling Green
Tyler Nielsen, LB, Iowa
Eric Latimore, DE, Penn State
Corey Paredes, LB, Hawaii
Austin Pasztor, OG, Virginia
Terrell Resonno, DT, Missouri
C.C. Whitlock, DB, South Carolina
Mitch Elliott, OL, Bethel College

 

 

Atlanta Falcons

Round 2 (55) – C Peter Konz, Wisconsin

Round 3 (91) – OT Lamar Holmes, Southern Mississippi

Round 5 (157) – FB Bradie Ewing, Wisconsin

Round 5 (164) – DE Jonathan Massaquoi, Troy

Round 6 (192) – S Charles Mitchell, Mississippi State

Round 7 (249) – DT Travian Robertson, South Carolina

*********************

Pat Schiller, LB, Northern Illinois
Josh Harris, LS, Auburn
Cory Pearcy, WR, Huntington
Lamark Brown, WR, Minn-Mankato
Tyler Horn, C, Miami
Chad Faulcon, S, Montclair State
Casey Therriault, QB, Jackson State
Jerrell Harris, LB, Alabama
Adam Nissley, TE, Central Florida
Louis Nzegwu, DE, Wisconsin
Dawson Zimmerman, P, Clemson
Micanor Regis, DT, Miami (FL)
Dominique Davis, QB, East Carolina
Bryce Harris, OT, Fresno State

 

 

Carolina Panthers

Round 1 (9) – LB Luke Kuechly, Boston College

Round 2 (40) – OG Amini Silatolu, Midwestern State

Round 4 (103) – DE Frank Alexander, Oklahoma

Round 4 (104) – WR Joe Adams, Arkansas

Round 5 (143) – CB Josh Norman, Coastal Carolina

Round 6 (207) – P Brad Nortman, Wisconsin

Round 7 (216) – S D.J. Campbell, California

*******************

Ryan van Bergen, DE, Michigan
Rico Wallace, WR, Shenandoah
Wes Kemp, WR, Missouri
Jared Green, WR, Southern
Matt Reynolds, OT, BYU
Brenton Bersin, WR, Wofford
Will Blackwell, C, LSU
Nate Chandler, DT, UCLA
Lyndon Rowells, RB, Humboldt State
Tauren Poole, RB, Tennessee

 

 

New Orleans Saints

Round 3 (89) – DT Akiem Hicks, Regina

Round 4 (122) – WR Nick Toon, Wisconsin

Round 5 (162) – S Corey White, Samford

Round 6 (179) – OG Andrew Tiller, Syracuse

Round 7 (234) – OT Marcel Jones, Nebraska

*******************

Laron Scott, CB, Georgia Southern
Braylon Broughton, OLB, TCU
Johnny Thomas, S, Ok State
Travaris Cadet, WR, Appalachian State
Aderious Simmons, OT, Arizona State
Jerico Nelson, S, Arkansas
Jose Gumbs, S, Monmouth
Tyrunn Walker, DL, Tulsa
Kadarron Anderson, LB, Furman
Brian Folkerts, OL, Washburn
Jacob Byrne, TE, Wisconsin
DeOn’Tae Pannell, OL, Penn State
A.J. Davis, CB, Jacksonville State
Stephen Johnson, LB, Temple
Aaron Tevis, LB, Boise State
Chris Givins, WR, Miami (OH)
Kevin Hardy, WR, Citadel
Justin Aldredge, FB, Northwestern State

 

 

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Round 1 (7) – S Mark Barron, Alabama

Round 1 (31) – RB Doug Martin, Boise State

Round 2 (58) – LB Lavonte David, Nebraska

Round 5 (140) – LB Najee Goode, West Virginia

Round 6 (174) – CB Keith Tandy, West Virginia

Round 7 (212) – RB Michael Smith, Utah State

*******************

Leonard Johnson, CB, Iowa State
Zach Collaros, QB, Cincinnati
Sean Baker, S, Ball State
Morkeith Brown, DE, Temple
Tyler Shoemaker, WR, Boise State
Mike VanDerMeulen, OL, Toledo
Brandon Herron, LB, Michigan
Chaz Hine, OG, South Florida
Tramaine Thomas, S, Arkansas
Adonis Thomas, RB, Toledo (Invite)
Dan Persa, QB, Northwestern (Invite)

 

 

Arizona Cardinals

Round 1 (13) – WR Michael Floyd, Notre Dame

Round 3 (80) – CB Jamell Fleming, Oklahoma

Round 4 (112) – OT Bobby Massie, Ole Miss

Round 5 (151) – OG Senio Kelemete, Washington

Round 6 (177) – DB Justin Bethel, Presbyterian

Round 6 (185) – QB Ryan Lindley, San Diego State

Round 7 (221) – OT Nate Potter, Boise State

********************

Scott Wedige, OL, Northern Illinois
Jared Crank, FB, Purdue
Broderick Binns, DE, Iowa
Tevita Finau, DL, Utah
Tre Gray, WR, Richmond
Marcus McGraw, LB, Houston
Zach Nash, DL, Sacramento State
Richetti Jones, DE, Oklahoma State
Paul Vassallo, LB, Arizona
Marc Wilson, WR, Saint Anslem
James Nixon, CB, Cal (PA)
Colin Parker, LB, Arizona State
Blake Gideon, S, Texas
Blake DeChristopher, OL, Virginia Tech
Conrad Obi, DT, Colorado
Jacory Harris, QB, Miami (Invite)

 

 

San Franciso 49ers

Round 1 (30) – WR A.J. Jenkins, Illinois

Round 2 (61) – RB LaMichael James, Oregon

Round 4 (117) – OG Joe Looney, Wake Forest

Round 5 (165) – OLB Darius Fleming, Notre Dame

Round 6 (180) – S Trenton Robinson, Michigan State

Round 6 (199) – OT Jason Slowey, Western Oregon

Round 7 (237) – OLB Cam Johnson, Virginia

*******************

Brian Tymes, WR, Florida A&M
Nathan Palmer, WR, Northern Illinois
Al Netter, OG, Northwestern
Joe Holland, OLB, Purdue
Garrett Celek, TE, Michigan State
DaJuan Cofield, RB, San Jose State
Jewel Hampton, RB, Southern Illinois
Kevin Murphy, OT, Harvard
Michael Thomas, S, Stanford
Chris Owusu, WR, Stanford
Matthew Masafilo, DE, Stanford
Johnson Bademosi, S, Stanford
Kourtnei Brown, DE, Clemson
Patrick Butrym, DL, Wisconsin
Georgio Tavecchio, K, California
Tony Jerod-Eddie, DL, Texas A&M

 

 

Seattle Seahawks

Round 1 (15) – DE/OLB Bruce Irvin, West Virginia

Round 2 (47) – LB Bobby Wagner, Utah State

Round 3 (75) – QB Russell Wilson, Wisconsin

Round 4 (106) – RB Robert Turbin, Utah State

Round 4 (114) – DT Jaye Howard, Florida

Round 5 (154) – LB Korey Toomer, Idaho

Round 6 (174) – CB Jeremy Lane, Northwestern State

Round 6 (181) – S Winston Guy, Kentucky

Round 7 (225) – DE J.R. Sweezy, North Carolina State

Round 7 (232) – DE Greg Scruggs, Louisville

*******************

Jermaine Kearse, WR, Washington
Phil Bates, WR, Ohio
London Durham, CB, McNeese State
Rishaw Johnson, G, California (PA)
Sean McGrath, LS/TE, Henderson State
Jon Opperud, OL, Montana
Deshawn Shead, DB, Portland State
Monte Taylor, DE, Cincinnati
Lavasier Tuinei, WR, Oregon
Addison Lawrence OL Mississippi State
James Stampley, FB, LSU
Carson Wiggs, K, Purdue

 

 

St. Louis Rams

Round 1 (14) – DT Michael Brockers, LSU

Round 2 (33) – WR Brian Quick, Appalachian State

Round 2 (39) – CB Janoris Jenkins, North Alabama

Round 2 (50) – RB Isaiah Pead, Cincinnati

Round 3 (65) – DB Trumain Johnson, Montana

Round 4 (96) – WR Chris Givens, Wake Forest

Round 5 (150) – OG Rokevious Watkins, South Carolina

Round 6 (171) – K Greg Zuerlein, Missouri Western

Round 7 (209) – LB Aaron Brown, Hawai’i

Round 7 (252) – RB Daryl Richardson, Abilene Christian

*******************

Matt Daniels, S, Duke
Cory Harkey, TE, UCLA
Matt Conrath, DT, Virginia
Alex Hoffman-Ellis, LB, Washington State
Derrick Choice, OLB, Stephen F. Austin
DeAngelo Peterson, TE, LSU
Sammy Brown, LB, Houston
Austin Davis, QB, Southern Miss
Johnny Hekker, P, Oregon State
Joe Long, OL, Wayne State
Noah Keller, LB, Ohio
Jamaar Jarrett, DE, Arizona State
Jeremy Caldwell, WR, Eastern Kentucky
T-Bob Hebert, C, LSU
Todd Anderson, FB, Michigan State
Travis Tripucka, LS, UMass
Calvin Middleton, RB, Jackson State

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