Tag Archives: 2014 NFL Combine

2014 NFL Combine Notes: Defensive Line & Linebacker

Monday brought with it my personal favorite day of the combine: conversions. Nothing intrigues me more than evaluating the hybrid types who have drawn the distinction of being a potential 3-4 rushers. We also got the opportunity to take a look at the rest of the linebackers and defensive linemen (both tackle & end) in attendance. Here are a few notes on Monday’s combine workouts:

Defensive Tackle

*Monday starts and ends with Pittsburgh’s Aaron Donald. The undersized (6’0 3/4″ 285 lbs.) 3-tech ran a 4.68 – the best among defensive tackles by a wide margin – threw up 35 reps on the bench press, and displayed his short-area burst with an impress 7.11 seconds in the 3-cone drill. His movement in drills was top notch. Donald, a potential late 1st round selection, had a really strong combine and only helped himself with his performance in Indy.

*The big man Ra’Shede Hageman of Minnesota once again caught eyes with his stellar physical makeup. He carries his frame very well and got East-West pretty comfortably. An athletic body-type with room to grow. Struggled to regularly stay low when participating in drills, which is consistent with his game film.

*The squatty Florida State product Timmy Jernigan showed off good, quick feet and a pretty strong looking frame to match. Able to sink hips well when changing direction, using hands well on bags. Bent his hips very well, maintaining balance nicely when moving laterally. Overall, had a nice day.

*Another individual who carried a big frame well was LSU’s Anthony Johnson. Combined good footwork with decent lateral ability. Another balanced, wide-based individual in drills.

*Penn State nose tackle-type DaQuan Jones was moving well for a 6’4″ 322-pounder. A little stiff when changing direction, but that’s okay for someone of his stature. Managed to keep low and look the part of a leverage-savvy inside lineman.

*Mr. Irish Chocolate himself, Notre Dame’s Louis Nix did himself no harm, in my opinion. Ran about as slow¬†(5.42) as you’d expect a natural 6’2 3/4″ 331-pound nose tackle to, but was moving better than I expected laterally and had a deceptively decent short-area burst.

*Louisiana Tech nose tackle Justin Ellis exhibited pretty decent movement for a bulky interior lineman. His lateral movement and ability to sink his hips, keeping a wide base, was something that particularly caught my eye. Late add at the Senior Bowl, where he was encouraging, Ellis has done a good enough job to keep the momentum going.

*Princeton’s Caraun Reid had a good day and is maintaining a solid pre-draft run up. He looked really quick in drills and ran a solid 4.91 as well. Movement skills were above-average, to me. He’s setting a good example for future Ivy Leaguers with pro aspirations. Do everything and make the most of opportunities.

Defensive End

*The big man on the draft circuit, South Carolina’s Jadeveon Clowney blazed the best 40-time amongst the DL groups, posting a 4.53 at a filled out 6’5″ 266-pounds. He did not participate in drills, but tallied nice numbers in both the vertical (37 1/2″) and broad (124.0″) jumps. I, like most, would have liked to see him compete, as he’s by no means a lock for No. 1 overall, but he did the job in physical testing. With that said, nobody ever doubted that aspect of his evaluation.

*Oregon State’s Scott Crichton was a bit of an eye-opener on Monday, displaying his high motor in drills and good short-area quickness. He has big hands and used them well in bag drills. Also carried his 6’3″ 273-pound frame well.

*Missouri’s Kony Ealy has a heavier frame and was moving well with it. Good short-area explosion is what caught my eye when watching him. Looked a little stiff at times, but nothing overly concerning.

*Despite being a bit of a tweener, I’m a fan of Texas’ Jackson Jeffcoat. Had somewhat of an up and down workout overall, but I couldn’t help noticing his quickness when getting lateral. On the other end of the spectrum, his ability to turn and run with fluidity left a little to be desired. Still unsure as to whether he is a fit in space as a 3-4 player – might be better off adding to his frame and putting his hand in the dirt, full time.

*Shepherd’s Howard Jones is a lean athlete who looked more like a linebacker – which is where he will play at the next level – rather than a lineman. Physical testing was solid and he moved about the field really well in drills. A little stiff when flipping his hips, but the athleticism was on full display. 40.5″ vertical, 124.0″ broad, 7.16 3-cone. All top shelf figures.

*Another player who will likely be playing in space as a 3-4 rusher moving forward is Boise State’s DeMarcus Lawrence. I was very impressed with his workout, as he had fluidity on display throughout every movement drill. I didn’t see much stiffness either. One of the players who won from his group, in my mind.

*One of my 2014 NFL Draft favorites, North Carolina’s Kareem Martin did well. At 6’6″ 272-pounds, ran a 4.72 time, moved without much stiffness, and had pretty active hands. Didn’t shock or awe the way I thought he was capable of, but still put together a good performance.

*USF’s Tevin Mims caught my attention at times. Pretty fluid in free-flow movement, change of direction was nice in conversion drills, and carried a 6’4″ 260-pound frame well. I see the foundation for a decent stand up 3-4 linebacker in his skill set.

*Ball State’s Jonathan Newsome looked like a linebacker running through drills with defensive linemen. Well-built athlete who was noticeably loose in movement. Change of direction and hip-flip skills were pretty solid, as well. Definite stand up conversion in most base fronts.

*The polarizing Michael Sam of Missouri was so-so throughout the day. Competed well and showed off a solid physical makeup, but was very rigid in change of direction throughout drills. Looked too stiff to play in space, lacked the sort of lower-body explosion I was expecting, and didn’t time well (4.91). Without sounding as though I’m piling on, as I do think there is a fit for him in a base 4-3, he’s got some work to do before May.

*Arkansas’ Chris Smith had a better day than I expected. Better in space than I saw compared to his in-game footage and showed off a good initial burst in many instances. Ran a 4.71, which was better than the 4.8-range I had him pegged for. Still needs to get a little strong, in my opinion.

*Lastly, Boston College’s Kasim Edebali was a high energy mover throughout the day. Noticeable quickness and burst in drills, ran alright at 4.79. I liked his change of direction skills and I think his best fit will come as a 3-4 player at the next level.


Linebacker

*Buffalo’s Khalil Mack entered the day with the distinction of being the best player available amongst the LB group. He didn’t disappoint, as he stayed fluid, looked loose, moved freely, and made a couple good catches. As a space player, he should be just fine. No hindering limitations in that regard. Ran well too, posting a 4.65 – good enough to tie him for the fourth best time. Impressive 40.0″ vertical and 4.18 shuttle numbers.

*Interesting UCLA product Anthony Barr put his raw talent on display. Bends very well and stayed really flexible in movement. Ran a solid 4.66 time and coupled it with a nice 6.82 in the 3-cone. Effortlessly carries his 6’5″ 255-pound frame and showed great initial burst. Definite 3-4 player to me if you’re looking to maximize Barr’s capabilities.

*I am very intrigued by Florida’s Ronald Powell. Very talented player packed with upside – a former top HS recruit at DE, I see a nice fit as a rush linebacker. Pretty fluid in space and has a little better hip bend than I saw on film. The physically gifted Gator also ran a nice 4.65.

*The Florida State linebackers had a solid day. In particular, Telvin Smith, who posted the second best time at 4.52, was flying through drills at high speed, and changed direction with ease. Versatile Christian Jones wasn’t as fluid as his teammate, but did exhibit quality footwork and used his hands well in bag drills.

*Boston College’s Kevin Pierre-Louis posted the fastest time, at 4.51, and put his footwork, good bend, and lateral quickness on display. Unfortunately he’s undersized and rounds a little when he’s changing direction.

*Notre Dame’s Prince Shembo was a pleasant surprise at the combine. Physical player who’s athleticism wasn’t believed to be the equal of some other peers in the LB group, but he proved capable. Much-better-than-expected 4.71 time, strong hand usage in bag drills, and was improved in East-West movement.

*Another athlete with versatility, USC’s Devon Kennard has played inside, outside, and at defensive end while with the Trojans. Great physical makeup, ran a clean 4.70, and looked pretty loose hipped for a player who exited HS as a defensive end. He has a lot of untapped pass rushing potential.

*Small-schooler Jordan Tripp from Montana had a very solid workout. Consistent and quick were the two positives I took from his combine. In a day where more than half the linebackers couldn’t catch a cold, let alone a football, Tripp made comfortable off-body grabs with regularity. He was active with good footwork. Even ran an impressive 4.67 time. FCS kids standing out.

*BYU’S Kyle Van Noy is an energy player who flowed well in drills. Good hips, changed direction pretty well, and did every drill at a high pace. He’s an all around player who needs to establish a fit for himself, but I see him succeeding in a number of schemes. Actually hit is head on a camera tripod while laying out for a ball near the sideline at one point.

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2014 NFL Combine Notes: Quarterback, Wide Receiver & Running Back

Things heated up at the 2014 NFL Combine on Sunday, as we witnessed an infusion of speed with the offensive playmakers. We saw a few of the “name” quarterbacks participate in throwing drills, while others opted to hold out until pro days. This year’s wide out class is as deep as it has ever been and coupled with a long list of running backs with very different skill-sets. Certainly an intriguing bunch to evaluate. here’s what caught my eye on day two of workouts in Indianapolis:

Quarterback

*Louisville’s Teddy Bridgewater was in attendance, tallying a 30″ vertical + 9’5″ broad jump, but chose not to throw. Johnny Manziel also opted to wait for his pro day to showcase his throwing, but ran a 4.68 time in the 40-yard dash, 31.5″ vertical, and 9’5″ broad jump.

*Virginia Tech’s Logan Thomas let it rip on Sunday. On film he exhibits an inability to control his arm with consistency, leading to erratic spells. In Indy, he was regularly throwing ropes to receivers in intermediate and longer range drills. He showcased well and surely will catch the eye of coaches who feel they can massage his most obvious creases. There obviously is no physical limitations, and he even clocked the best time of any quarterback with a 4.60. Without ruling out his future as a passer, it’s worth noting that he’s got the size + speed to entice some as a prospective tight end… a position he was highly touted at out of high school.

*Tajh Boyd of Clemson displayed pretty solid timing with his foreign receivers. Drops were quick and easy, release was compact. Made a couple nice throws downfield.

*Alabama’s A.J. McCarron is one of the more under-appreciated passers of this class, and his downfield throwing abilities don’t get the due credit, in my view. On Sunday, he made three very nice, very accurate deep throws for completions. McCarron was putting a little bit of loft under his short-intermediate throws and out-route simulation drills, but overall it was a positive showing.

*Highly touted UCF passer Blake Bortles threw and had a good day. Solid on deep passes. Perhaps most importantly, there was no evident loss of velocity, as some have been increasingly concerned about in this pre-draft run up. Short-intermediate range throws were released with pretty noticeable strength.

*Eastern Illinois’ Jimmy Garoppolo didn’t really stand out to me, but continued to display really good footwork. This carried over from his solid Senior Bowl performance, and I believe it translated into pretty good timing despite unfamiliarity with the receivers.

*Pittsburgh’s Tom Savage was arguably the best of the second group on Sunday and displayed a strong arm with good timing.

Running Back

*Nobody did more to earn the label of “workout warrior” out of the running back group than Georgia Southern’s Jerick McKinnon. He marked the second-fastest 40-time among his position (4.41), the most bench press reps (32), second best vertical (40.5), second best broad jump (11’0″). Performed well in drills, looked fluid and quick when running routes. Had a really good day.

*Kent State’s Dri Archer was, by far, the fastest timed player of his positional group after posting a blazing 4.26 time in the 40-yard dash. He exhibited comfortable, off-body hands. Archer made me a believe that he can be utilized as both a running back and slot-receiver in order to get him touches in space. Could be a legitimate playmaker if placed in the right system.

*Blake Bortles running back at UCF was the talented Storm Johnson, who put together a very solid combine workout. The Miami (FL) transfer solidified the notion that he has good hands and can be a factor in the passing game, making a handful of quality off-body grabs. Loose, fluid movement for a well-sized ‘back. Likely to remain in my top 5 for the position.

*Washington’s Bishop Sankey made a bit of a statement. A primarily downhill, North-South runner who ran really well (4.49) and showed reliable hands in catching drills. Good hips, bent well, stayed loose.

*Alabama State’s Isaiah Crowell did himself good with a solid performance at the combine too. Was moving really nicely and intrigued with a couple quality catches off his frame. Timed speed was average at best, but the former 5-star recruit from the University of Georgia flashed enough talent to warrant a look.

*Lache Seastrunk of Baylor checked out physically. Very muscular, strong lower-body and it translated well – the ex-Oregon Duck had the best vertical (41.5) and broad (11’2″) jumps, putting his explosion on full display.

*Oregon x-factor and return specialist De’Anthony Thomas underwhelmed in his 40-time, clocking in at a 4.50, but looked as quick as you’d expect. Teams will have to find creative ways to get him in space, but he has the electricity to intrigue a team hungry for a potential playmaker and returner.

*Auburn’s Tre Mason wasn’t really a standout amongst his positional group, but didn’t perform poorly either. Solid in receiving drills, but could have maybe ran routes with a little more purpose. Aside from that, he competed and did himself no harm.

*Ohio State’s Carlos Hyde ran his first 40-yard dash and pulled up holding his left hamstring. He did not participate in any drills afterward as a precaution.

*For a bigger, bulkier ‘back like Toledo’s David Fluellen, he was able to sink his hips and change direction really nicely. Pleasantly surprised by his decent fluidity.

Wide Receiver

*First and foremost, the fastest timed receiver was Oregon State’s Brandin Cooks, who clocked a 4.33. A fleet-footed burner with the ability to play in the slot or out wide. Looked explosive during drills.

*Clemson’s Sammy Watkins didn’t get me out of my seat with his workout, but he flashed the occasional “wow” moment during the day in drills. Great body control, really solid hands, and did everything at a high speed, while remaining efficient in his movement He may be disappointed with it, but his official 4.43 time was nothing to scoff at.

*Johnny Manziel’s most talented target Mike Evans was a standout among his section of wide receivers. Long athlete who displayed really good hands all throughout the day, plucking off his frame with regularity and comfort. Looked a little stiffer in and out of his breaks, but strides nicely downfield.

*Kelvin Benjamin looks like a specimen at 6’5″ 240 lbs. definitely passed the eye-test. Ran a 4.61, which is fine for a player of his stature, and demonstrated his ability to use his length when making catches. Had a bit of a propensity to drop the occasional pass this past season, but was pretty consistent in making catches during combine drills. Appeared to be a little less rigid than Mike Evans when changing direction or sticking his foot in the ground in/out breaks.

*Big, physical Rutgers pass catcher Brandon Coleman ran a really solid 4.51 time at 6’6″ 225 lbs. Made a few nice catches downfield and overall, I believe he helped himself. Physical makeup is very interesting.

*Disappointing 4.60 time for Penn State underclassman Allen Robinson, but he proved on film that he could get separation and win in 50-50 situations when he was in them. Still, his physical testing wasn’t anything more than average.

*LSU’s Odell Beckham Jr. exhibited impressive body control during the gauntlet drill and ran routes with authority. Timed speed of 4.43 was a good figure for him, as well.

*Ole Miss’ Donte Moncrief was up and down in drills, but physically did well. Ran an impressive 4.40 and was a top performer in the vertical and broad jumps. Big frame was carried well.

*A surprise from Pittsburgh State (KS) John Brown blazed a 4.34 and looked very quick in and out of cuts during drills. Accelerated quickly and stayed loose all throughout the day. I’ll have to do a little more work.

*Alabama’s Kevin Norwood is a player I’ve been high on for some time now. He struggled to consistently complete drills without the occasional drop.

*Oklahoma slot-man Jalen Saunders was agile and electric, ran fast (4.44), and looked good enough in a variety of drills to indicate he could line up out wide on occasion too – which film also suggest, in my view.

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